Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi

Maker Barn Organizer Creates Makerspace Access Control System

via Hackaday » hardware

The MakerBarn is a new makerspace between The Woodlands and Tomball, TX (north of Houston). [George Carlson], one of the founders and a retired design engineer, wanted to make sure only members certified on a machine could use it. He worked with [Kolja Windeler] to create the MACS or Makerspace Access Control System. He has one video explaining MACS and, after the break, another explaining the browser based user interface for the system.

20151205_181615A control box, [George] calls them stations, controls the power to a machine. Member badges have an RFID tag that is read when inserted into the station’s reader. If the member is authorized to use the machine, the power is enabled. For safety, the member’s badge must remain in the reader to maintain power. The reader uses a Photon board from Particle with a WiFi link to a Raspberry Pi server.

[Kolja] developed a Pi system to maintain a database of member numbers and the machines they can use. The list is sent to the stations periodically or when updates occur. The user interface is browser based on the MakerBarn’s LAN so it can be maintained by a computer or smartphone in the space. Presently 21 MACS modules have been built with some going to Hanover University in Germany for their auto hobby shop.

Not only did [George] lead the effort on creating MACS but has been key to getting the construction done inside a pole barn to make the MakerBarn a reality.


Filed under: Hackerspaces, hardware, Raspberry Pi, tool hacks

Home automation with Telegram BOT

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Luca Dentella has written an article describing how he developed a bot to control his Raspberry Pi via Telegram:

 The project I’m going to describe today it’s a sort of proof of concept that will demonstrate the possibility to remote control sensors and actuators (for example a couple of relays) via Telegram.
Telegram is an instant messaging application, similar to the famous Whatsapp. Last June, the Telegram developers announced that a new set of APIs were available to develop bots.
My idea was to develop a bot, running on my Raspberry Pi, that receives commands via Telegram chats.

Project info at Luca Dentella’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Windows 10 IoT core controlling a Raspberry Pi 2 robot

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Windows 10 IoT Core running a Raspberry Pi 2 robot by Scott Hanselman:

Starting with a Raspberry Pi 2, walk through the setup instructions here. You do need to have a Windows 10 today to installing Windows 10 IoT Core but at least it’s gotten a lot easier with the latest build for IOT. There’s an app that does all the work and you don’t need to go to the command line. Also get Visual Studio 2015 Community and the Windows IoT Core Project Templates. Basically just follow these step-by-step instructions.

Project info at Scott’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Raspberry Pi garage door controller

via Dangerous Prototypes

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As a follow up to yesterday’s Raspberry Pi and ARM uC Breakout + DirtyPCBs mini-review post,  hipfan75 has posted the completed Raspberry Pi-based Garage Door controller project:

Right now, all of the sensors and actuators are connected to Raspberry Pi GPIOs. At some point I may move them to the STM32.
I have disabled I2C on the PI and use the SDA/SCL pins as GPIO, reusing the external pull-up resistors on those lines for my sensor pullups. (Sensors are active-low)
GPIO 17, 27, 22, 23 (outputs) are used for the light and door toggles for the two garage doors.

Project info at hipfan75 imgur.   Reddit discussion here.

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Raspberry Pi and ARM uC Breakout + DirtyPCBs mini-review

via Dangerous Prototypes

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hipfan75 writes:

Briefly, it’s a Raspberry Pi v1, Model B, Rev2 breakout with an STM32F030 microcontroller connected to the Pi UART, with all GPIOs for both broken out. There are also connectors for an NRF24L01+ module, a 12V boost module, and 315/433 Mhz wireless transmitters.
One board will serve as my Garage Door Controller, while the others will be used for general Pi hacking.
This was my first board manufactured at DirtyPCBs.com. I was very impressed with both the ordering and fulfillment process, as well as the boards themselves.

Reddit discussion here.