Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi

Building a Raspberry Pi UPS and serial login console with tinyK22 (NXP K22FN512)

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Erich Styger has been working on a UPS with the Raspberry Pi to cover a short power out:

There are different ways to ruin a Linux system. For the Raspberry Pi which uses a micro SD card as the storage device by default, it comes with two challenges:
1.Excessive writes to the SD card can wear it out
2.Sudden power failure during a SD card write can corrupt the file system
For problem one I do I have a mitigation strategy (see “Log2Ram: Extending SD Card Lifetime for Raspberry Pi LoRaWAN Gateway“). Problem two can occur by user error (“you shall not turn it off without a sudo poweroff!”) or with the event of a power outage or black out. So for that problem I wanted to build a UPS for the Raspberry Pi.

Project info on MCU on Eclipse site.

Game of Life on a Raspberry Pi (and a LED board) in Haskell

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Trandi published a Game of Life on a Raspberry Pi in Haskell project, that is available on Github:

This is a quick post about, re-purposing my Raspberry Pi + Peggy2 art installation, which already re-purposes a 8-9 years old Peggy2 LED board, to play Conway’s Game of Life.

More details on Robotics /Electronics /Physical Computing blog.

Check out the video after the break.

PI serial adaptor

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Raspberry pi serial adaptor from Facelesstech:

If you spend a lot of time building things with a raspberry pi you will eventually run into the problem that you have booted your pi it’s not plugged into a tv/monitor and it’s not connected to wifi. You don’t want to just turn it off because it could corrupt the sd card so what do you do. I recently ran into this problem but luckily I had a serial adaptor on hand to hook up and tell my pi to turn off.

See the full post on his blog and the GitHub repository here.

Check out the video after the break.

Raspberry Pi GPIO programming in C

via Dangerous Prototypes

Raspberry-GPIO

Steve Chamberlin has written an article about Raspberry Pi GPIO programming in C:

The Raspberry Pi’s 40-pin GPIO connector often gets overlooked. Typical Pi projects use the hardware as a very small desktop PC (RetroPie, Pi-hole, media center, print server, etc), and don’t make any use of general-purpose IO pins. That’s too bad, because with a little bit of work, the Raspberry Pi can make a powerful physical computing device for many applications.

More details at Big Mess o’ Wires homepage.

Raspberry Pi virtual floppy for ISA (PC XT/AT) computers

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Dr. Scott M. Baker wrote an article detailing how he turned a Raspberry Pi into a virtual storage device for ISA bus computers:

I’m tired of carrying compact flash cards and/or floppies back and forth to my XT computer. I like to do development at my desk using my modern windows PC. While I can certainly use a KVM switch to interact with the retro computer from my Windows desktop, it would be a lot more convenient if I could also have a shared filesystem. There are several alternatives, from serial port solutions, to network adapters. However, I wanted something that would emulate a simple disk device, like a floppy drive, something I could even boot off of, so I implemented a virtual floppy served from a Raspberry pi.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

Converting a Seeburg 3WA wallbox into a remote for a modern music player

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Dr. Scott M. Baker wrote an article detailing how he converted a Seeburg 3WA wallbox into a media player for his homebuilt audio player:

A bit of background. These Wallboxes were used as remotes in diners and other locations back in the 1950s. You put your nickel, dime, or quarter into the Wallbox, which racks up some credits. Then you select the song you want and the Wallbox sends a signal to the Jukebox, which adds your selection to the queue. Soon thereafter your music is playing through the diner. I’m too young to have experienced these in person when they were state of the art, but I do have an appreciation for antique and retro projects.
A new fad is to convert these wallboxes into remotes for your home audio system, be it Sonos or something else. I have my own homebuilt audio system, basically an augmented Pandora player, so my goal was to use the wallbox to control that.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.