A birthday gift: 2GB Raspberry Pi 4 now only $35

via Raspberry Pi

TL;DR: it’s our eighth birthday, and falling RAM prices have allowed us to cut the price of the 2GB Raspberry Pi 4 to $35. You can buy one here.

Happy birthday to us

In two days’ time, it will be our eighth birthday (or our second, depending on your point of view). Many of you set your alarms and got up early on the morning of 29 February 2012, to order your Raspberry Pi from our newly minted licensee partners, RS Components and Premier Farnell. In the years since, we’ve sold over 30 million Raspberry Pi computers; we’ve seen our products used in an incredible range of applications all over the world (and occasionally off it); and we’ve found our own place in a community of makers, hobbyists, engineers and educators who are changing the world, one project, or one student, at a time.

The first Raspberry Pi

When we first started talking about Raspberry Pi 1 Model B back in 2011, we were very clear about what we were trying to build: a desktop Linux PC with interfacing capabilities for $35. At the time, it seemed obvious that our low price point would come with compromises. Even though you could use your Raspberry Pi 1 to watch HD video, or play Quake 3, or compile the Linux kernel, or automate a factory, some things – like browsing modern, JavaScript-heavy websites – were out of reach.

Our very first website led with an early prototype running an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop

Improving performance

Every subsequent product – from quad-core Raspberry Pi 2 in 2015, to 64-bit Raspberry Pi 3 in 2016, to Raspberry Pi 3+ in 2018 – whittled down those compromises a little further. By offering steadily increasing processing power at a time when the performance of traditional PCs had begun to stagnate, we were gradually able to catch up with typical PC use cases. With each generation, more people were able to use a Raspberry Pi as their daily-driver PC.

The Raspberry Pi I’d buy for my parents

Until, in June of last year, we launched Raspberry Pi 4. Roughly forty times faster than the original Raspberry Pi, for the first time we have a no-compromises PC for the majority of users. I’ve described Raspberry Pi 4 as “the Raspberry Pi I’d buy for my parents”, and since I bought them a Desktop Kit for Christmas they’ve found it to be basically indistinguishable in performance and functionality from other PCs.

In a sense, this was a “mission accomplished” moment. But Raspberry Pi 4 brought its own compromises: for the first time we couldn’t fit as much memory as we wanted into the base product. While the $35 1GB device makes a great media player, home server, or embedded controller, to get the best desktop experience you need at least 2GB of RAM. At launch this would have cost you $45.

Dropping the price of 2GB

Which brings us to today’s announcement. The fall in RAM prices over the last year has allowed us to cut the price of the 2GB variant of Raspberry Pi 4 to $35. Effective immediately, you will be able to buy a no-compromises desktop PC for the same price as Raspberry Pi 1 in 2012. In comparison to that original machine, we offer:

  • 40× the CPU performance
  • 8× the memory
  • 10× the I/O bandwidth
  • 4× the number of pixels on screen
  • Two screens instead of one
  • Dual-band wireless networking

And of course, thanks to inflation, $35 in 2012 is equivalent to nearly $40 today. So effectively you’re getting all these improvements, and a $5 price cut.

We’re going to keep working to make Raspberry Pi a better desktop computer. But this feels like a great place to be, eight years in. We hope you’ve enjoyed the first eight years of our journey as much as we have: here’s to another eight!

FAQs

Is this a permanent price cut?

Yes.

What about the 1GB product?

In line with our commitment to long-term support, the 1GB product will remain available to industrial and commercial customers, at a list price of $35. As there is no price advantage over the 2GB product, we expect most users to opt for the larger-memory variant.

What about the 4GB product?

The 4GB variant of Raspberry Pi 4 will remain on sale, priced at $55.

The post A birthday gift: 2GB Raspberry Pi 4 now only $35 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build a DMX FeatherWing to control lights with a Feather M0

via Dangerous Prototypes

Glen Akins writes:

This project uses an Adafruit Feather M0 Basic Proto board to control a group of Color Kinetics or other RGB light fixtures using the DMX-512 protocol. We’ll build a DMX-512 interface FeatherWing then connect it to the Feather M0 using a Particle Ethernet FeatherWing. Once the hardware is built and assembled, we’ll write software with a web-based GUI to generate RGB lighting effects and control the attached RGB lights using the DMX protocol. By modifying the software on the Feather M0, different effects can be generated and added to the web-based GUI.

Project info at bikerglen.com.

Play Pong with ultrasonic sensors and a Raspberry Pi | HackSpace magazine

via Raspberry Pi

Day three of our Pong celebration leads us here, to HackSpace magazine’s ultrasonic hack of Eben’s Code the Classics Pong tribute, Boing!

If you haven’t yet bought your copy of Code the Classics, you have until 11:59pm GMT tonight to get £1 off using the discount code PONG. Click here to visit the Raspberry Pi Press online store to secure your copy, and read on to see how you can use ultrasonic sensors to turn this classic game into something a lot more physical.

Over to the HackSpace magazine team…

Code the Classics is an entertaining book for a whole bunch of reasons, but one aspect of it that is particularly exciting to us makers is that it means there are some games out there that are really fun to play, but also written to be easy to understand and have high-quality game art to go along with them. Why does this excite us as makers? Because it makes them ideal candidates for testing out novel DIY games controllers!

Pong

We’re going to start right at the beginning of the book (and also at the beginning of computer game history) with the game Pong. There’s a great chapter on this seminal game in the book, but we’ll dive straight into the source code of our Boing! tribute game. This code should run on any computer with Python 3 (and a few dependencies) installed, but we’ll use a Raspberry Pi, as this has GPIO pins that we can use to add on our extra controller.

Download the code here by clicking the ‘Clone or download’ button, and then ‘Download ZIP’. Unzip the downloaded file, and you should have a directory called Code‑The‑Classics-master, and inside this, a directory called boing-master.

Open a terminal and navigate to this directory, then run:

python3 boing.py

If everything works well, you’ll get a screen asking you to select one or two players – press SPACE to confirm your selection, and have a play.

Hacking Code the Classics

So that’s how Eben Upton designed the game to be played. Let’s put our own spin on it. Games controllers are basically just sensors that take input from the real world in some way and translate that into in-game actions. Most commonly, these sensors are buttons that you press, but there’s no need for that to be the case. You can use almost any sensor you can get input from – it sounds trite, but the main limitation really is your imagination!

We were playing with ultrasonic distance sensors in the last issue of HackSpace magazine, and this sprung to mind a Pong controller. After all, distance sensors measure in one dimension and Pong bats travel in one dimension.

Last issue we learned that the main challenge when using the cheap HC-SR04 sensors with 3.3V devices is that they use 5V, so we need to reduce their output to 3.3V. A simple voltage divider does the trick, and we used three 330Ω resistors to achieve this – see Figure 1 for more details.

There’s support for these sensors in the GPIO Zero Python library. As a simple test, you can obtain the distance with the following Python code:

import gpiozero
import time
sensor = gpiozero.DistanceSensor(echo=15,trigger=14)

while True:
    print(sensor.distance)

time.sleep(0.1)

That will give you a constant read-out of the distance between the ultrasonic sensor and whatever object is in front of it. If you wave your hand around in front of the sensor, you’ll see the numbers changing from 0 to 1, which is the distance in metres.

So far, so straightforward. We only need to add a few bits to the code of our Boing! game to make it interact with the sensor. You can download an updated version of Boing! here, but the changes are as follows.

Add this line to the import statements at the top:

import gpiozero

Add this line to instantiate the distance sensor object at the end of the file (just before pgzrun.go()):

p1_distance = DistanceSensor(echo=15,trigger=14,queue_len=5)

We added the queue_len parameter to get the distances through a little quicker.

Finally, overwrite the p1_controls function with the following:

def p1_controls():
    move = 0
    distance = p1_distance.distance
    print(distance)
    if distance < 0.1:
        move = PLAYER_SPEED
    elif distance > 0.2:
        move = -PLAYER_SPEED
    return move

This uses the rather arbitrary settings of 10 cm and 20 cm to define whether the paddle moves up or down. You can adjust these as required.

That’s all there is to our ultrasonic Pong. It’s great fun to play, but there are, no doubt, loads of other versions of this classic game you can make by adding different sensors. Why not see what you can come up with?

Code the Classics

Today is the last day to get £1 off Code the Classics with the promo code PONG, so visit the Raspberry Pi Press online store to order your discounted copy before 11:59pm GMT tonight.

You can also download Code the Classics as a free PDF here, but the book, oh, the book – it’s a marvellous publication that deserves a physical presence in your home.

The post Play Pong with ultrasonic sensors and a Raspberry Pi | HackSpace magazine appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Dumpster Dive is Today

via SparkFun: Commerce Blog

It’s time to dive… Dumpster Dive that is. Product is available starting at 12 p.m. MT and will be available until we run out of boxes (210 of them, to be exact). At 12 p.m. MT, click the image below to go to the the Dumpster Dive product page (it will not be clickable until the product is live). If there are units still available, you will be able to add one to your cart and then proceed to check out. You can also find links to the product on the New Product carousel on the SparkFun homepage, as well as the New Product Page starting at 12 p.m. MT.

The Dumpster Dive - 1 lb.

The Dumpster Dive - 1 lb.

DD-16348

What's a Dumpster Dive? Between samples, customer returns, demo items, and old stuff that’s been sitting on the shelves for way too long, we’ve amassed quite a few bins worth of various electronic stuff. It ranges from one-off items, to items that are a little broken or ugly, to items that aren’t worth individually listing and selling. We didn’t like the idea of recycling them, since it could still be useful and worth getting into people’s hands. And so behold: the Dumpster Dive.

Rules for the Dive:

  • Product will be live until we run out. No backorders available.
  • February 26, 2020, live at 12 p.m. MT
  • Limit one $20 box per customer
  • One-pound boxes only
  • U.S. customers only
  • No combining of orders
  • No on-site sales
  • No support or returns

Unfortunately, we were unable to extend the Dumpster Dive outside of the United States this year. This decision is still based on shipping restrictions becoming stricter, compliance complications, and material handling safety concerns.

As a reminder: The Dumpster Dive is a gamble and the contents are not guaranteed. We will not provide tech support or returns on any of the goods since many are not products we ever supported, or they might be returns with unknown defects. We will be getting orders out as quickly as possible, but cannot promise same-day shipping.

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OpenAstroTracker is a tracking and GoTo mount for DSLR astrophotography

via Arduino Blog

Stars appear to stand still, but wait a few minutes and they won’t be in quite the same place. This means that if you want to take a long-exposure image of the sky with your DSLR you’ll have to either embrace the streaks, or use tracking hardware to compensate for this movement. Naturally, this specialized equipment can be quite expensive, but a seen here, you can now make your own 3D-printed OpenAstroTracker controlled by an Arduino Uno.

The device features a 16×2 LED display/keypad shield, along with an optional Bluetooth module for interface. When set up, it slowly rotates the camera to compensate for star movements via two steppers on a gimbal assembly. 

Print files for the OpenAstroTracker are available on Thingiverse and code can be found on GitHub if you’d like to examine the design or even build your own. Its creator also plans to sell it as a DIY kit — and you can sign up to be notified when it’s available.

Sinilink WIFI-USB mobile remote controller

via Dangerous Prototypes

Peter Scargill blogged about his AliExpress Sinilink WIFI USB controller project:

So here’s a thing – I had this all set up and working perfectly with Tasmota on my WiFi – then plugged the unit (USB male end) into a USB3 connector – and it immediately lost the lot – well, the settings, not Tasmota – I had to go back to using my mobile phone as an access point and re-enter the info. That’s annoying but the reset after USB3 plugin might be related to somehow triggering the “normal” Tasmota device recovery, which indeed does a “factory reset”. So what I did next after advice from subscriber “sfromis”, was to use “SetOption65 1” in Tasmota console (which is a non-volatile setting) and I’ve had no trouble since – on the same USB3 hub.

More details on Scargill’s Tech Blog.

Check out the video after the break.