Turning a Tic Tac box into a portable magnetometer

via Arduino Blog

If you want a way to measure magnetic fields on the go, then look no further than this tiny device from Instructables user “rgco.”

The portable magnetometer was made using just a couple of common parts, including an SS49E linear Hall effect sensor, an Arduino Nano, a 0.96” OLED screen, and a push button.

All the electronics are concealed inside a Tic Tac box, which holds the components together and provides a window for the display. The SS49E itself is isolated from the rest of the unit via a ballpoint pen tube, which allows it to be placed in narrow openings without interference. 

For increased accuracy, the sensor was calibrated using a cylindrical electromagnet, and the project was prototyped using an Uno before being stuffed into its rather small enclosure.

What was your first Raspberry Pi project?

via Raspberry Pi

Quick and simple blog post today: what was your first Raspberry Pi project? Or, if you’ve yet to enter the world of Raspberry Pi ownership, what would you like to do with your Raspberry Pi once you get one?

Answer in the comments below, or on Twitter using #MyFirstRaspberryPi. Photos aren’t necessary, but always welcome (of the project, not of, like, you and your mates in Ibiza circa 2001).

Share your story to receive ten imaginary house points (of absolutely no practical use, but immense emotional value) and a great sense of achievement looking at how far you’ve come.

The post What was your first Raspberry Pi project? appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Friday Product Post: Ooh! What Does This Button Do?

via SparkFun: Commerce Blog

Hello everyone and welcome to this week's Friday Product Post! We have a few new products to show off and it all starts with new Qwiic boards. Due to popular demand, two Qwiic Button boards have been moved over from SparkX to a full production run, one with a pre-populated RED LED Tactile Button and one without, so you can decide which color you'd prefer. Second is the GreatFET One from Great Scott Gadgets, and we finish off the day with a new Weather Meter Kit!

Button, button. Who's got the button?

SparkFun Qwiic Button - Red LED

SparkFun Qwiic Button - Red LED

BOB-15932
$7.50
SparkFun Qwiic Button Breakout

SparkFun Qwiic Button Breakout

BOB-15931
$4.95

Buttons are an easy and tactile way to interface with your project, but why would you want to deal with debouncing, polling and wiring pull-up resistors? The SparkFun Qwiic Button with Red LED simplifies all of those worries away with an easy to use I2C device! Utilizing our Qwiic Connect System, using the button is as simple as connecting a cable and loading up some pre-written code! If you don't want a red LED for a button, the Qwiic Button Breakout version allows you to choose which color illuminated button you want to solder onto your breakout to match your project!


GreatFET One

GreatFET One

DEV-16267
$99.95

The GreatFET One from Great Scott Gadgets is a hacker's best friend! With two USB ports, one host and one peripheral, it can act as a "man in the middle" for USB interfacing. The GreatFET One connects to a host computer and extends the reach of said computer to the outside world. Whether you need an interface to an external chip, a logic analyzer, a debugger, or just a whole lot of pins to bit-bang, the versatile GreatFET One is the tool for you. Hi-Speed USB and a Python API allow GreatFET One to become your custom USB interface to the physical world. With an extensible, open source design, two USB ports and 100 expansion pins, GreatFET One is your essential gadget for hacking, making and reverse engineering.


Weather Meter Kit

Weather Meter Kit

SEN-15901
$64.95

Whether you're an agriculturalist, a professional meteorologist or a weather hobbyist, building your own weather station can be a really rewarding project. When you're measuring weather, however, you need some pretty specialized sensors. This kit represents the three core components of weather measurement: wind speed, wind direction and rainfall.


That's it for this week! As always, we can't wait to see what you make! Shoot us a tweet @sparkfun, or let us know on Instagram or Facebook. We’d love to see what projects you’ve made!

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HackSpace’s 25 ways to use a Raspberry Pi

via Raspberry Pi

The latest issue of HackSpace magazine is out today, and it features a rather recognisable piece of tech on the front cover.

25 ways of using this tiny computer

From personal computing and electronic fashion to robotics and automatic fabrication, Raspberry Pi is a rather adaptable piece of kit. And whether you choose to use the new Raspberry Pi 4, or the smaller, $5 Raspberry Pi Zero, there are plenty of projects out there for even the most novice of hobbyists to get their teeth into.

This month’s HackSpace magazine, a product of Raspberry Pi Press, is packed full of some rather lovely Raspberry Pi projects, as well as the magazine’s usual features from across the maker community. So, instead of us sharing one of the features with you, as we usually do on release day, we wanted to share them all with you.

Free PDF download

Today’s new issue of HackSpace is available  as a free PDF download, and, since you’re reading this post, I imagine you’re already a Raspberry Pi fan, so it makes sense you’ll also like this magazine.

So download the free PDF (the download button is below the cover image) and let us know what you think of HackSpace magazine in the comments below.

More from HackSpace magazine

If you enjoy it and want to read more, you can get a HackSpace magazine subscription or purchase copies from Raspberry Pi Press online store, from the Raspberry Pi store, Cambridge, or from your local newsagent.

As with all our magazines, books, and hardware, every purchase of HackSpace magazine funds the charitable work of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. So if you enjoy this free PDF, please consider purchasing future issues. We’d really appreciate it.

The post HackSpace’s 25 ways to use a Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

New products: Pololu Wheels for Micro and Standard Servos

via Pololu Blog

We are thrilled to announce the release of our wheels for micro and standard sized servos. These wheels are similar to our wheels for 3mm D shafts and consist of a durable ABS hub with a silicone tire. They are currently available in 40, 60, 70, and 90 mm diameter options. All but the 40 mm size feature mounting holes that are compatible with various versions of our universal mounting hubs and slots in the spokes that allow additional accessories to be mounted to the wheel such as decorations or parts of an encoder system.

Black Pololu Wheels for Standard and Micro Servos – 90, 70, 60, and 40 mm diameters.

The 40 mm and 60 mm sizes are compatible with micro servo splines with 20 teeth and a 4.8 mm diameter and can be used with the following continuous rotation servos that we carry:

The 70 mm and 90 mm sizes are compatible with standard servo splines with 25 teeth and a 5.8 mm diameter and can be used with the following continuous rotation servos that we carry:

If you plan on using the wheels with a servo not listed above, be sure to check your servo’s specifications for compatibility as servo splines are not standardized for particular sized servos.

These wheels, like many of our plastic parts, are designed by us at our Las Vegas facility and then injection molded in China. Usually, we ship bulkier parts made overseas by boat, which can take several months to get here. We were so excited about these, though, that we couldn’t wait that long! So, we had a small amount shipped by air to make them available as soon as possible. This means the initial stock of these is limited, and while we’ll have more coming by boat, the upcoming Chinese New Year will delay that even more than usual. So if you don’t want to miss out on these initial units, order yours soon!

Introductory special

As usual, we are offering an extra introductory special discount on these wheels, to help share in our celebration of releasing new products. The first hundred customers to use coupon code SERVOWHEELS can get 22% off up to 3 pairs of each size!

Ionization chamber

via Dangerous Prototypes

Robert Gawron has posted an update on his Ionization chamber project we covered previously:

Ionization chamber is a device to measure radioactivity level. When air’s atoms are hit by radioactive particles, an ion-pair is produced. Ions has electric charge, if they are in electric field create by positive and negative electrodes, negative ions will move to positive electrode and positive will move to negative electrode. They will try to “meet each other” thus creating a current. This current can be measured. The current is proportional to amount of ion-pairs. Amount of ion-pairs is proportional to radioactivity level.

More details on Gawron’s blog.