Stream PC games to your TV

via Raspberry Pi

Why spend hundreds of quid on a Steam Machine when you can do exactly the same thing with a humble Raspberry Pi? (The B+ is available for $25, which is about £16, at RS Components at the moment, if you’re really on a budget.)

Here are the Possibly Unsafe guys to walk you through setup.

I’ve swiped the instructions below from their YouTube channel:

Setup:
You’ll first need to install the latest Rasbian from here:
http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/

Next download Limelight Embedded. Grab the latest limelight.jar and libopus.so from here:
https://github.com/irtimmer/limelight…

Make sure that your gaming PC has an NVIDIA GTX 600+ graphics card and GeForce Experience installed.

Pairing:
To make things easier, enable SSH on the RPi and tunnel in to the machine. Here are some useful commands:

List compatible PCs
java -jar limelight.jar list

Pair with PC
java -jar limelight.jar pair PC-IP

Map a controller
java -jar limelight.jar map -input /dev/input/eventX mapfile.map

Start streaming
java -jar limelight.jar stream -1080/720 -60fps/30fps PC-IP -app Steam -mapping mapfile.map

Make sure to check the Limelight help file in case things have changed since this post!

Possibly Unsafe’s a rather brilliant channel; I’m making their homemade Sriracha chilli sauce just as soon as I can get my hands on enough habaneros. You can support them via their Patreon if you like the things they do.

Wire Your Arduino Sensors to the Cloud with Temboo Streaming

via Arduino Blog

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Our friends at Temboo just introduced a new way to log data from an Arduino Yún to the cloud. Called Streaming, it lets you visually select the sensors attached to your Arduino that you have gathering data, and then stream that data to the cloud IoT platform of your choice.

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Streaming also makes it easy to switch where you’re sending your data once your application is running, without requiring any hardware or software updates. Right now, Streaming works with Microsoft’s Power BI and Google’s BigQuery, but Temboo will be continuing to add more platforms in the future. As with Temboo’s other Arduino programming tools, Streaming lets you generate all the code you need for your application right in your browser, and tailors that code to the parameters that you specify. It makes it much easier to store sensor data from your Arduino in the cloud, and to analyze the datasets that you build.

This video shows you how it works:

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April Caption Contest Winner

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

A couple weeks back, we challenged you to come up with the best/funniest/most clever caption to the photo below. As usual, the entries came flying in and we had a number of worthy competitors. Unfortunately, only one person can take home the prize (in this case, $100 in sweet SparkFun credit).

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Here at SparkFun, we put the IoT in idIoT.

Congratulations, BeerCannon, your semi-disparaging comment tickled our funny bones and you are now the proud owner of $100 in SparkFun credit. Keep an eye on your email for more details.

Thanks to all of you that participated – we’ll be back with another caption contest next month!

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A DIY Fourier Transform Spectrometer

via Hackaday » hardware

Typical spectrometers use prisms or diffraction gratings to spread light over a viewing window or digital sensor as a function of frequency. While both prisms and gratings work very well, each there are a couple of downsides to each. Diffraction gratings produce good results for a wide range of wavelengths, but a very small diffraction grating is needed to get high-resolution data. Smaller gratings let much less light through, which limits the size of the grating. Prisms have their own set of issues, such as a limited wavelength range. To get around these issues, [iliasam] built a Fourier transform spectrometer (translated), which operates on the principle of interference to capture high-resolution spectral data.

[iliasam]’s design is built with an assortment of parts including a camera lens, several mirrors, a micrometer, laser diode, and a bunch of mechanical odds and ends. The core of the design is a Michelson interferometer which splits and recombines the beam, forming an interference pattern. One mirror of the interferometer is movable, while the other is fixed. [iliasam]’s design uses a reference laser and photodiode as a baseline for his measurement, which also allows him to measure the position of the moving mirror. He has a second photodiode which measures the interference pattern of the actual sample that’s being tested.

Despite its name, the Fourier transform spectrometer doesn’t directly put out a FFT. Instead, the signal from both the reference and measurement photodiodes is passed into the sound card of a computer. [iliasam] wrote some software that processes the sampled data and, after quite a bit of math, spits out the spectrum. The software isn’t as simple as you might think – it has to measure the reference signal and calculate the velocity of the mirror’s oscillations, count the number of oscillations, frequency-correct the signal, and much more. After doing all this, his software calculates an interferogram, performs an inverse Fourier transform, and the spectrum is finally revealed. Check out [iliasam]’s writeup for all the theory and details behind his design.


Filed under: hardware

Benton Park Live Coding Orchestra – The Planets

via Raspberry Pi

The kids from Benton Park have gone on to media superstardom in this short from the BBC. You’ve met the Benton Park Live Coding Orchestra before – they live-code music in Sonic Pi for school performances. This time, they’re making music about the planets, using Holst’s Planets Suite as a jumping-off point.

The Live Coding Orchestra kids are in years 5 and 6 (so they’re all between nine and eleven years old); the dancers in this performance are all from the Reception class and the Nursery group (aged five and under). As well as providing music for the little kids to dance to, the Live Coding Orchestra spent some time teaching them how to create music in Sonic Pi – you can see them doing some training at the start of the video.

The music sets the mood for dancing on three different planets, with a rocket trip between each planet orchestrated by Holst. Best thing we’ve seen in ages – thanks Live Coders, and thanks dancers! (If your adblocker has made the video below invisible, you can check it out at the BBC’s website.)

SparkFun Live is today!

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

The day is upon us! Join us at the video link below at 3:00 MT today, and e-textiles gurus Angela and Amanda will showcase some awesome new projects - perfect for prom! - and help you build a color-changing LED corsage using our Silk Flower LED. If you need a refresher on the materials list, you can revisit it here, and if you aren’t able to tune in this time, we have a tutorial of the project here. See you at 3:00!

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Droplet photography

via Raspberry Pi

I get asked sometimes what my favourite projects from this blog are. Dave Hunt’s water droplet photography’s right up there: Dave rigged up a Pi to trigger a solenoid valve and a camera shutter at the same time, to take perfectly timed macro photos of water drops. You can see his original, beautiful pictures here in our archives.

Over in Germany, Markus May has based his own rig on Dave’s, with a few alterations; he’s also put a lot of effort into lighting and colour effects, with spectacular results.

Markus’ original blog post is in German, but Google Translate does a pretty bang-up job of making things understandable for idiots like me who promptly forgot all the German they knew moments after taking a GCSE exam in it. (I still remember that Zwiebel means onion, but that won’t get you far on holiday unless you really like onions.)

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We love this stuff: bringing the sort of thing you could only do with an expensive professional rig inside the budget an amateur with a DSLR might have gets us really excited.

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This rig is more involved than Dave’s original, with a couple of Mariotte’s bottles which produce an equal flow rate, however full the bottles are. Guar gum for thickening, milk for opacity and food colouring went into the liquid for extra gorgeousness.

Tropfen_RPi-201526

Markus has made a circuit diagram available, and Dave’s original post still contains everything you’ll need to make your own rig. There are more of these spectacular photographs at Markus’ Flickr, and you’ll find a great writeup of the original session, with behind-the-scenes pictures at his blog post.

Call for Makers is open! Join Maker Faire Rome 2015

via Arduino Blog

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Last year Maker Faire Rome welcomed 600 projects, 200 performances, 90.000 visitors coming from all over the world.  Maker Faire Rome – The European Edition recently announced its third edition scheduled from the 16th to the 18th of October 2015 and will take place at  “La Sapienza” University in Rome, exceptionally “closed” for three days to host this international event.

The Curators of the Faire, Massimo Banzi, co-founder of Arduino and Riccardo Luna, italian Digital Champion, are inviting makers of all kinds and ages to showcase their amazing work and embrace the do-it-yourself (or do-it-together) spirit with a great and appreciative audience.

Are you a Maker, an Innovator, a digital Craftsman? The MakerFaireRome’s Call4Makers is out!

There are many ways to participate:

  • you can exhibit your project: we’ll give you a booth with table and chairs inside the halls, which will be filled with visitors who are curious and interested in meeting you
  • you can give a presentation in public: we’ll give you a room or a stage where you can talk about your project or tell your story or deal with the issues that you want to propose
  • you can hold a workshop: we’ll give you a workshop area where you can do interactive demonstrations and engage participants -adults and / or children- in practical activities
  • you can perform in public: we’ll give you a space or a stage for you to perform in your creative, technological, robotic, musical, pyrotechnic performance…

The proposals regarding the exposure of projects, if accepted, will lead to the allocation of a booth, free of charge. Presence is required at this booth while Maker Faire Rome 2015 is open to the public (three days). It will also be possible to sell products or gadgets.

Accepted projects will be valorized on the MakerFaire Rome website. Besides, Maker Faire Rome press & media team will diffuse info about participants to the newspapers, radio and television stations, which in the past years have devoted a lot of attention to the projects and performers.

We expect creative, innovative, fun, interactive projects, showing the process by which the achievements enrich visitors, communicating passion and ingenuity.

Are you thinking about participanting? In the meanwhile:

  • spread the word! #MFR15
  • help us to involve all the makers you know (and especially those who still do not know they are makers!)
  • subscribe to our newsletter to keep informed about news, events and discounts!

We are looking forward to seeing you all in Rome in October!

Submit your project now! (By May 31)