A DIY Segway-style vehicle

via Arduino Blog

Instructables user “stoppi71” has been building a DIY Segway for a while now, and just posted a bunch of info on the project.

Balancing on two side-by-side wheels is rather difficult, though as the original Segway showed us, it’s quite possible with electronics to help. Naturally, hobbyists have tried to duplicate this effort, including stoppi71, who started his experiments several years ago. He uses both an accelerometer and gyroscope to determine the angle, along with PID control to apply the correct amount of power to each wheel. Buttons on either side handle steering.

Though not the easiest project featured here, if you’re thinking about doing something simlar, his writeup is worth a look! If you enjoy alternative modes of transportation, you may want to check out this electric unicycle as well!

Six Patents That I’m Going to Need, Like, Yesterday

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

Here are just a few of the patents I found that could really find a place in my life if someone wants to get them on the Home Shopping Network sooner rather than later.

You know how sometimes you really want to go relax on the lake and catch a few fish, but you don’t actually want to have to do any fishing…and you do actually want to have to clean some fish? Don’t worry! There’s a patent for that!

alt text
Finally!


The only thing better than this autonomous suitcase is imagining hundreds of them in an airport, all trying to get to different places. It’s like “Fantasia” for road warriors (your call whether it’s an elegant “Waltz of the Flowers” or a nightmarish “Sorcerer’s Apprentice”!) Also, the sensor is in your shoe! Fifty points to wearables*!

alt text
Yes, yes, a hundred times yes.


Okay, maybe I don’t need a flaming prank wallet full of flaming prank money, but someone does. That said, I do think a little more consideration is in order before we move forward with the suggestion that it would be a hoot and a half at a gas station.

alt text

What could go wrong?


Sorry. Blame 2016 for this one. I don’t want to live in a world without Leonard Cohen, and I think a swarm of weaponized autonomous underwater swarmbots are probably on the same page. I mean in that they also don’t want me to live in a world without Leonard.

alt text

Sorry, sometimes you just want to watch the world burn.


I want it, you want it, everyone who has ever wanted to print a D&D figurine that they can roll in Cheetos powder and munch on after a vampire’s pet coffin mimic perms their character wants it**. This is a goldmine.

alt text

Are you paying attention, Soylent? Because this is a collaboration opportunity!


Taco Tape. Open source community? We really dropped the ball on this. It was right in front of us, if we’d only opened our eyes. And Mr. Schreiner? Please don’t patent troll us on this one. We need you. The world needs you. My burrito needs you.

alt text

No, there aren’t any electronics. No, I’m not sorry.

Everyone feeling better about patents? Yeah, I was too until I found a 2014 patent for “pants.”

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

If these products were open source, users would be empowered to get out there and make them even better. Make the robot clean the fish! Make the filament taste…better? OK? I don’t know where our filament flavor standards are, truthfully. Consider maybe autonomous underwater hugbots! Make the suitcase follow literally anything that will make the TSA less antsy than your shoes will! But because they’re patented, they’re static until the inventor acts on them. So get out there and open source something! (But not pants. They’re already patented. Try shirts!)

*The points are meaningless; Dumbledore’s just going to give it to IOT at the end of the year regardless of standings.
** It happens.

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Six Patents That I’m Going to Need, Like, Yesterday

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

Here are just a few of the patents I found that could really find a place in my life if someone wants to get them on the Home Shopping Network sooner rather than later.

You know how sometimes you really want to go relax on the lake and catch a few fish, but you don’t actually want to have to do any fishing…and you do actually want to have to clean some fish? Don’t worry! There’s a patent for that!

alt text
Finally!


The only thing better than this autonomous suitcase is imagining hundreds of them in an airport, all trying to get to different places. It’s like “Fantasia” for road warriors (your call whether it’s an elegant “Waltz of the Flowers” or a nightmarish “Sorcerer’s Apprentice”!) Also, the sensor is in your shoe! Fifty points to wearables*!

alt text
Yes, yes, a hundred times yes.


Okay, maybe I don’t need a flaming prank wallet full of flaming prank money, but someone does. That said, I do think a little more consideration is in order before we move forward with the suggestion that it would be a hoot and a half at a gas station.

alt text

What could go wrong?


Sorry. Blame 2016 for this one. I don’t want to live in a world without Leonard Cohen, and I think a swarm of weaponized autonomous underwater swarmbots are probably on the same page. I mean in that they also don’t want me to live in a world without Leonard.

alt text

alt text

Sorry, sometimes you just want to watch the world burn.


I want it, you want it, everyone who has ever wanted to print a D&D figurine that they can roll in Cheetos powder and munch on after a vampire’s pet coffin mimic perms their character wants it**. This is a goldmine.

alt text

Are you paying attention, Soylent? Because this is a collaboration opportunity!


Taco Tape. Open source community? We really dropped the ball on this. It was right in front of us, if we’d only opened our eyes. And Mr. Schreiner? Please don’t patent troll us on this one. We need you. The world needs you. My burrito needs you.

alt text

No, there aren’t any electronics. No, I’m not sorry.

Everyone feeling better about patents? Yeah, I was too until I found a 2014 patent for “pants.”

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

If these products were open source, users would be empowered to get out there and make them even better. Make the robot clean the fish! Make the filament taste…better? OK? I don’t know where our filament flavor standards are, truthfully. Consider maybe autonomous underwater hugbots! Make the suitcase follow literally anything that will make the TSA less antsy than your shoes will! But because they’re patented, they’re static until the inventor acts on them. So get out there and open source something! (But not pants. They’re already patented. Try shirts!)

*The points are meaningless; Dumbledore’s just going to give it to IOT at the end of the year regardless of standings.
** It happens.

comments | comment feed

Community Profile: Zach Igielman

via Raspberry Pi

This column is from The MagPi issue 49. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Zachary Igielman

Zach Igielman

Category: Maker
Day job: Student
Website

You may recognise the name Zachary Igielman from issue #38, where he was mentioned during our review of the exciting Pimoroni Piano HAT. The Piano HAT, for those unaware, was inspired by Zach’s own creation, the PiPiano, a successful crowdfunded add-on board that hit 184% of its funding two years ago. Aged 14, Zach had decided to incorporate his passions for making, engineering, and music, building himself a PCB that could use physical keys to control electronic sound files and Sonic Pi code. The PCB, he explains, is a great classroom tool, educating students on the fundamentals of physically building digital tech and soldering, through to understanding sound generation through PWM frequencies.

Zachary Igielman

PiPiano: Zach taught himself how to build a PCB in order to bring the PiPiano to life. Using Indiegogo to fund his project, Zach hit 184% of his target before approaching Pimoroni to hand over the design. And from his homemade PCB, the Piano HAT was born.

Zach began to teach himself to code aged 11, soon discovering the Raspberry Pi and, later, the Cambridge Raspberry Jams. It was through this collective of like-minded individuals that Zach was inspired to broaden his making skills, moving on to create line-following robots that avoided objects by using sensors.

Moving forward, Zach visited the Raspberry Pi offices for work experience, continuing to work on and study robots and robotic guides, working alongside our engineers to build upon his knowledge. It was around this time, in October 2014, that Zach met Frank Thomas-Hockey via Twitter. Frank was looking for help in creating the first London Raspberry Jam and Zach was more than willing to lend a hand. Between them, they 
set up the Covent Garden Jam, welcoming over 100 visitors to their first event. Their most recent Jam – now with the additional help of volunteers Ben, Paul, and Joseph – allowed them to simultaneously run workshops on soldering, Sonic Pi, and Minecraft, while also highlighting maker projects through show-and-tell sessions and talks.

Zachary Igielman Covent Garden Jam

Covent Garden Raspberry Pi Jam: Through Twitter, Zach met Frank in 2014, a like-minded Pi enthusiast looking to start a London-based Raspberry Jam. Between the two of them, they launched the first event at Dragon Hall, continuing the success of the Jam to now include multiple workshops, show-and-tell sessions, and talks.

Finally finished with his GCSE exams and about to begin his sixth-form studies in Maths, Further Maths, Physics, and Computing, Zach now has the time to continue his recent collaboration with friend Jake Blumenow.

Zach met Jake and built a fast friendship online, lovingly referring to him as a fellow “computer geek”. The two have worked on projects together, including several websites, and spent time travelling, bouncing ideas off one another with the aim of creating something important. It’s their most recent venture that’s worthy of recognition.

“At Google Campus, we developed our business model: we believe people of all ages have the right to understand how the technological world around us works, so they can modify and create their own technology.”

Between the two of them, they aim to create complete Raspberry Pi education kits, inviting beginners in making and coding to create functional projects, such as an alarm system, thus cementing the pair’s desire to highlight the day-to-day importance of tech in our lives.

Zachary Igielman Jake Blumenow

Collaboration with Jake Blumenow: Zach and Jake believe everyone has the right to understand how technology builds the world around them. With this in mind, they formed a partnership, working to create Raspberry Pi educational kits, starting with a DIY alarm system.

The post Community Profile: Zach Igielman appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Peeqo is a desktop bot that communicates through GIFs

via Arduino Blog

If you’ve been looking for a robotic assistant with the functionality of an Amazon Echo and the cuteness of a Disney character, you’re in luck. That’s because Abhishek Singh has created Peeqo, an open-source DIY device that responds to human speech through GIFs.

Peeqo has a Raspberry Pi 3 for his brain along with a pair of Arduino Mini boards for controlling movement and LED notifications. The 3D-printed bot is equipped with a half-dozen servos, four custom microphones, a NeoPixel ring on top of his head, a camera at his chest, a USB speaker, and an LCD display.

As for voice recognition, Peeqo uses the Google Speech API for detecting the wake word ‘Peeqo’ and API.AI for responding to the query. The desktop companion can also serve as a full-fledged entertainment system that plays your favorite Spotify tunes. Ask for a song and he’ll sway to the beat.

But that’s not all. Singh even developed a Chrome extension that uses Peeqo to boost his productivity and motivate him to avoid social media while working. Once he tells it to block a certain site, the robot lets his displeasure be known in the form of a GIF.

Intrigued? You can see how Singh brought Peeqo to life on Imgur.

Serial seven segment LED display shield

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics- serial-seven-segmentLED-600

Raj over at Embedded Lab has just finished a new project article about a serial seven segment LED display shield:

Seven segment LED displays are brighter, more attractive, and provide a far viewing distance as well as a wider viewing angle compared to LCD displays. This project describes a serial seven segment LED display shield for Arduino Uno or compatible boards. The shield consists of eight 0.56″ seven segment displays that are driven by one MAX7219 chip. The shield also features a light dependent resistor (LDR) to implement adaptive brightness control to the LED displays. The LDR output can be fed to A0 or A1 analog input channel of Arduino to read the surrounding illumination level. Arduino can then use that information to adjust the brightness of the LED displays. A demo code and Eagle CAD files are also provided in the latter part of the article.

Full details at Embedded Lab blog.