How to make a simple 1 watt audio amplifier (LM386 based)

via Dangerous Prototypes

schematic7-750x422

A tutorial on making an LM386 audio amplifier circuit from Afrotechmods:

A tutorial on how to use the popular LM386 class AB audio amplifier IC to build a simple mono 1 watt audio amplifier. It costs less than $3 in parts! There is also a brief discussion of how to use high pass filters to prevent op-amp oscillation and subsequent noise.

More info at Afrotechmods tutorial page.

Check out the video after the break.

Dot² isn’t your typical coffee table

via Arduino Blog

Coffee tables are useful for putting coffee, food, or perhaps way too much junk on, but it’s 2017—we can do better than that! Akshay Baweja certainly has at least with Dot², an interactive piece of furniture that can run animations, display lighting effects, and play old-school games.

The Arduino Mega-based table features a matrix of 296 LEDs that shine up through sections of diffused acrylic, and uses a grid of foam board strips to keep each light in a square. Dot² can be controlled either by a PC running GLEDIATOR software, or via a smartphone using a Bluetooth connection and its own custom app.

The outside doesn’t look too shabby either. With an interesting wood pattern on the side, even when off it seems like there could be something more lurking just below the table’s glass!

Want to build one of your own? Head over to this incredible project’s Instructables page to get started. And, if you’d like to know more about how it’s controlled, check out Baweja’s app here or GLEDIATOR’s site for the computer software he used.

Friday Product Post: An Inauguration of New Products

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

Hello, and welcome, one and all, to another Friday Product Post! It is Inauguration Day here in the United States, and we have three brand new products to show off that we really think you’ll love. To start off, we have a new Haptic Motor Driver that utilizes the DRV2605L from Texas Instruments. We also have a new ORP (Oxidation Reduction Potential) Kit and EZO™ circuit carrier from Atlas Scientific. Enough of the introduction…let’s jump in and see what we have!

HAP-tastic!

SparkFun Haptic Motor Driver - DRV2605L

ROB-14031
$ 6.95

Ready to add some good vibes to your project? Look no further than the SparkFun Haptic Motor Driver. This board breaks out Texas Instruments' DRV2605L Haptic Motor Driver, which adds meaningful feedback from your devices using the breakout and an Arduino-compatible device.

The DRV2605L is capable of driving two different types of motors, ERM and LRA. We have created an Arduino library that makes the DRV2605L easy to use with six different ERM effects and one LRA effect.

ORP Kit

SEN-14090
$ 174.95

Second up is the ORP Kit, a large sensor kit that measures the ability of a solution to act as an oxidizing or reducing agent. Inside the kit you will find everything you need to get started, including an ORP probe, an EZO ORP board, two bottles of solution and a BNC connector board.

EZO Carrier Board

SEN-14091
$ 46

The Electrically Isolated USB EZO Carrier Board allows you to connect your EZO-type Atlas Scientific circuit directly to your computer or Raspberry Pi. Built-in isolation ensures that your circuit will be protected from interference, ground loops and harmful voltages. Simply attach an Atlas Scientific EZO-type module to the top of the carrier board, plug in your USB and BNC cables, and you’re all set!

EZO boards can be found in the ORP Kit above as well as our pH Sensor, Dissolved Oxygen and Electrical Conductivity kits. Basically, if you have an EZO circuit from Atlas Scientific, this carrier board will make your life so much easier.

Alright, folks, that’s it for this week. We hope you will enjoy any and all of these three new products. We’ll be back next Friday, when we anticipate some great ideas will STEM from the new products that will be released! See you all then!

comments | comment feed

The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s Digital Making Curriculum

via Raspberry Pi

At Raspberry Pi, we’re determined in our ambition to put the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world: one way we pursue this is by developing high-quality learning resources to support a growing community of educators. We spend a lot of time thinking hard about what you can learn by tinkering and making with a Raspberry Pi, and other devices and platforms, in order to become skilled in computer programming, electronics, and physical computing.

Now, we’ve taken an exciting step in this journey by defining our own digital making curriculum that will help people everywhere learn new skills.

A PDF version of the curriculum is also available to download.

Who is it for?

We have a large and diverse community of people who are interested in digital making. Some might use the curriculum to help guide and inform their own learning, or perhaps their children’s learning. People who run digital making clubs at schools, community centres, and Raspberry Jams may draw on it for extra guidance on activities that will engage their learners. Some teachers may wish to use the curriculum as inspiration for what to teach their students.

Raspberry Pi produces an extensive and varied range of online learning resources and delivers a huge teacher training program. In creating this curriculum, we have produced our own guide that we can use to help plan our resources and make sure we cover the broad spectrum of learners’ needs.

Progression

Learning anything involves progression. You start with certain skills and knowledge and then, with guidance, practice, and understanding, you gradually progress towards broader and deeper knowledge and competence. Our digital making curriculum is structured around this progression, and in representing it, we wanted to avoid the age-related and stage-related labels that are often associated with a learner’s progress and the preconceptions these labels bring. We came up with our own, using characters to represent different levels of competence, starting with Creator and moving onto Builder and Developer before becoming a Maker.

Progress through our curriculum and become a digital maker

Strands

We want to help people to make things so that they can become the inventors, creators, and makers of tomorrow. Digital making, STEAM, project-based learning, and tinkering are at the core of our teaching philosophy which can be summed up simply as ‘we learn best by doing’.

We’ve created five strands which we think encapsulate key concepts and skills in digital making: Design, Programming, Physical Computing, Manufacture, and Community and Sharing.

Computational thinking

One of the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s aims is to help people to learn about computer science and how to make things with computers. We believe that learning how to create with digital technology will help people shape an increasingly digital world, and prepare them for the work of the future.

Computational thinking is at the heart of the learning that we advocate. It’s the thought process that underpins computing and digital making: formulating a problem and expressing its solution in such a way that a computer can effectively carry it out. Computational thinking covers a broad range of knowledge and skills including, but not limited to:

  • Logical reasoning
  • Algorithmic thinking
  • Pattern recognition
  • Abstraction
  • Decomposition
  • Debugging
  • Problem solving

By progressing through our curriculum, learners will develop computational thinking skills and put them into practice.

What’s not on our curriculum?

If there’s one thing we learned from our extensive work in formulating this curriculum, it’s that no two educators or experts can agree on the best approach to progression and learning in the field of digital making. Our curriculum is intended to represent the skills and thought processes essential to making things with technology. We’ve tried to keep the headline outcomes as broad as possible, and then provide further examples as a guide to what could be included.

Our digital making curriculum is not intended to be a replacement for computer science-related curricula around the world, such as the ‘Computing Programme of Study’ in England or the ‘Digital Technologies’ curriculum in Australia. We hope that following our learning pathways will support the study of formal curricular and exam specifications in a fun and tangible way. As we continue to expand our catalogue of free learning resources, we expect our curriculum will grow and improve, and your input into that process will be vital.

Get involved

We’re proud to be part of a movement that aims to empower people to shape their world through digital technologies. We value the support of our community of makers, educators, volunteers, and enthusiasts. With this in mind, we’re interested to hear your thoughts on our digital making curriculum. Add your feedback to this form, or talk to us at one of the events that Raspberry Pi will attend in 2017.

The post The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s Digital Making Curriculum appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Debugging ARM Cortex-M0+ HardFaults

via Dangerous Prototypes

next-step-will-be-a-hard-fault

Erich Styger has written an article on debugging a hard fault on an ARM Cortex-M0+ device:

To me, one of the most frustrating things working with ARM Cortex-M cores are the hard fault exceptions. I have lost several hours this week debugging and tracking an instance of a hard fault on an ARM Cortex-M0+ device.

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

EMP Jammer build

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-F5I1C56IXUS8NZ4-600

A how-to on making an EMP jammer from JunezRiyaz, project instructables here:

An electromagnetic pulse (EMP), also sometimes called a transient electromagnetic disturbance, is a short burst of electromagnetic energy. Such a pulse may occur in the form of a radiated electric or magnetic field or conducted electrical current depending on the source. EMP Jammer is a device capable of generating a transient electromagnetic disturbance that radiates outward from its epicenter, disrupting electronic devices.

Check out the video after the break.