A special day dedicated to Arduino in Stockholm

via Arduino Blog

mbanzi-stockholm

Tekniska Museum of Stockholm in collaboration with Italian Embassy, and the Royal Institute of Technology  (KTH), will host a special edition of the Arduino Day on the 26th of November.

Massimo Banzi and David Cuartielles together with professors from KTH and some of the most creative professionals, students and enthusiasts, will be the protagonists of a showcase of inspirational lectures and Pop Up speeches suitable for both hardcore Arduino fans as well as for the curious newbie.

Are you in Stockholm next week? Come and say hello!

tekniska

The program

Part 1: h.14:00 – 16:00 (Entrance with museum Ticket)

Presentations and Q&A in Althinsalen at Tekniska museet.

– Massimo Banzi (Arduino founder)
– David Cuartielles (Arduino founder)
– Clara Leivas (Interaction Designer)
– Dr Jon-Erik Dahlin (KTH) Ellen Sundh (Creative Technologist)
– Sagar Moreshwar Behere, PhD (KTH)

Part 2: h.16:00 – 20:00 (free entrance from 17:00)

Four hours of Arduino Maker Faire in Eventrummet at Tekniska museet.

Professionals, students and amateurs show their Arduino projects with improvised Pop-Up talks among the projects.

– Massimo Banzi (Arduino founder)
– David Cuartielles (Arduino founder)
– Ellen Sundh (Creative Technologist)
– Dr Carlo Fischione, (KTH)
– Dr Jon-Erik Dahlin (KTH)
– Rickard Dahlstrand (.SE)
– Members of Stockholm Robot Society Members of Stockholm Maker Space
– Leonardo Araujo de Assis (University of Brasilia)

Parallax BASIC Stamp Discovery Kit – USB #27807

via Pololu - New Products

The Parallax BASIC Stamp Discovery Kit is a complete kit for learning microcontroller programming and basic electronics. The 40+ activities in the included text teach you how to program the BASIC Stamp 2 microcontroller and make simple electronic circuits controlled by the BASIC Stamp. Once you complete the activities and learn the concepts covered, you will have the skills to start making your own electronic inventions!

SparkFun Inventor’s Kit – V3.2 (with Arduino-Compatible RedBoard)

via Pololu - New Products

The SparkFun Inventor’s Kit has everything you need to construct a variety of circuits that will teach you how to use an Arduino-compatible RedBoard to read sensors, display information on an LCD, drive motors, and more. No previous programming or electronics experience is necessary, which makes this a great way for beginners to get started with embedded systems. Version 3.2 adds a new Simon Says circuit with all the LEDs and tactile buttons needed to complete it, and a new full-color guidebook.

Oh Barbie, You’ve Missed the Mark Again

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

As a child growing up, I played with Barbies. Needless to say, I have a soft spot in my heart for them. Yesterday, Barbie caught my eye in the news (Warning: potentially NSFW language in that article).

She was becoming a Computer Engineer and learning how to code! Except… that wasn’t really what was going on. Barbie designs a game (which is a great thing on its own) but proved to be unable to do it without the help of her male friends. Not only that, her laptop (and her sister’s) became infected with a virus, so she asks her computer science teacher how to fix it. Even though she has the knowledge to fix her computer, the boys step in because “it will be faster” to just let them do it.

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How condescending.

Though I was never actively discouraged from going into any sort of engineering field, I was never actively encouraged either. After being hired by SparkFun, I’ve been inspired to start learning how to code. So far, it’s been a pretty frustrating journey, but I’m rather determined to figure electronics out. This Barbie debacle frustrates me more than any code I’ve encountered. As a woman just beginning to learn how to code, this book makes me angry. Barbie implies that women can’t code; they depend on men to do the hard work, and then take the credit for the work. Why couldn’t Barbie have figured out how to code the game herself? Why didn’t she fix her computer on her own? She had the knowledge.

This book had so much potential to encourage girls to begin exploring technology, and yet… it failed pretty miserably. Thanks Barbie, but I’ll be reading about Grace Hopper for real coding inspiration, and getting back to working on my projects.

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A collection of Pis

via Raspberry Pi

Liz: Today’s guest post comes from Alex Eames, who runs the rather wonderful RasPi.TV. He’s been furtling through his drawers, and has discovered he owns a surprising number of Raspberry Pi variants. Thanks Alex! 

Now we have the A+, I thought it’d be a good time to celebrate its ‘birth’ by having a rundown of the various mass-produced models of Raspberry Pi.

I had a look through my collection and was somewhat surprised to see that I have 10 different variants of Raspberry Pi now. There is one I don’t have, but more about that later. Here’s the family photo. You can click it for a higher resolution version.

Raspberry_Pi_Family_A-annotated-15001

Rev 1 Model B

In row 1, column 1 we have the Rev 1 model B. Although I was up early on 29th February 2012, I didn’t get one of the first 10,000 Pis produced. This was delivered in May 2012. It’s a Farnell variant (I have an RS one as well, but it does full-time duty as my weather station). This was the original type of Pi to hit the market. It has 256 Mb RAM and polyfuses on the USB.

Rev 1 Model B – With Links

In row 1, column 2 you’ll see a slightly later variant of Rev 1 model B. This one has 0 Ohm links instead of polyfuses. It helped to overcome some of the voltage drop issues associated with the original Rev 1, but it introduced the “hot-swapping USB devices will now reboot your Pi” issue, which was fixed in the B+.

Rev 2 Model B (China)

Row 2, column 1. Here we have an early Rev 2 Pi. This one was manufactured in China. It originally had a sticker on saying “made in China”, but I took it off. This one was bought some time around October 2012. The Rev 2 model B has 512 Mb RAM (apart from a few early ones which had 256 Mb), mounting holes and two headers called P5 and P6.

Rev 2 Model B (UK)

Row 2, column 2. This is a much later Rev 2 Pi, made at SONY in Wales, UK.

Chinese Red Pi Rev 2 Model B

Row 3, column 1. This is one of the Red Pis made especially for the Chinese market. They are not allowed to be sold in the UK, but if you import one yourself that’s not a problem. It is manufactured to a less stringent spec than the ones at SONY, and is not EMC tested. Therefore it bears no CE/FCC marks.

Limited Edition Blue Pi Rev 2 Model B

Row 3, column 2. I’m not going to go into how I got hold of this. Suffice it to say it was not at all easy, but no laws were broken, and nobody got hurt. RS had 1000 of these made in March 2013 as a special limited anniversary edition to use as prizes and awards to people who’ve made a special contribution to education etc. I know of about 5 or 6 people who have them. (At least two of those people traded for them.) They are extremely hard to get. They come in a presentation box with a certificate. I have #0041. Other than their blueness, they are a Rev 2 model B Pi.

Model A

Row 1, Column 3 is a model A. The PCB is identical to the Rev 2 model B, but it has only one USB port, no ethernet port, no USB/ethernet chip and 256 Mb RAM. The $25 model A was released in February 2013. On the day I got mine, the day after launch, I made a quick and dirty “I’ve got mine first” video, part of which ended up on BBC Click. The model A sold about 100k units. Demand for it was outstripped by the model B, although at one point CPC was offering a brilliant deal on a camera module and model A for £25 (I snagged a couple of those).

Compute Module

Row 2, column 3 is the Compute Module, sitting atop the Compute Module development board. This was launched 23 June 2014 as a way to enable industrial use of the Pi in a more convenient form factor. The module is made so it fits in a SODIMM connector and is essentially the BCM 2835, its 512 Mb RAM and 4 Gb of eMMC flash memory with all available GPIO ports broken out. It costs $30 when bought by the hundred.

Model B+

Row 3, column 3 is the model B+. This was launched on 14 July 2014 and was a major change in form factor. Rounded corners, corner mount holes, 40 GPIO pins, 4 USB ports, improved power circuitry and a complete layout redesign. The B+ was announced as the ‘final revision’ of the B. So it would appear that it’s going to be with us for some time.

Model A+

In row 4, all by itself we have the shiny new Raspberry Pi A+, launched 10 November 2014. It’s essentially the same as a B+ with the USB end cut off. It’s the smallest, lightest, cheapest, and least power-hungry Pi of all so far. It’s 23g, $20 and uses just half a Watt at idle.

So Which One Don’t I Have?

I don’t have a Rev 2 256 MB variant. If you have one and would like to trade or sell it to me, I’d be happy to hear from you (alex AT raspi.tv).

I believe there is also now a red Chinese B+ I’ve not got one of those, but it’s only a matter of time. I wonder if there will be a red A+ at some point too? We Just Don’t Know!

 

 

AMA with Nate & Pete is IMMINENT

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

Good afternoon. Remember to tune in, in a little over half an hour (at 3:00 p.m. MT), to a special edition of SparkFun Live, where CEO Nate and Director of Engineering Pete will convene on the old couch in Engineering to answer a bevy of your clever/insightful/unusual questions on camera. You can find the video here:

You’ll be able to submit questions via the YouTube chat during the session or leave them in the comments section below and we’ll do our best to select a handful. See you there!

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Having fun with your Materia 101 – 3d printing tutorial

via Arduino Blog

krisstof-malmo

We recently launched Materia 101 3d printer, happy to know some of you are already using it  and having fun with 3d printing. In order to lower the barriers to this technology even more and to allow you to experiment on interesting stuff, we planned to create a series of tutorials for beginners.

Today we are ready to present you the first tutorial created by Kristoffer working at Arduino in Malmo. He’s going to post e a step-by-step guide every week on different topics and also ready to receive your feedbacks on the Arduino forum.

Take a look at the “Getting Started with Materia 101” tutorial and learn how to print and take care of your printer for amazing results.

The tutorial has goodie inside: an Octocat g-code file you can download to create a perfect print of the weird creature you can see in the picture below!

octocat

Next week we are going to post a tutorial to create cool 3d-printed gadgets for your home. Stay tuned. #Materia101

The 2014 SparkFun Holiday Gift Guide

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

Well, by now Halloween is a thing of the past, and the glorious season of Festivus will be upon us before you know it. Whether your holidays trend toward the Costanzian or the Dickensian, we’ve compiled our customary annual guide to help make your gift-giving a little easier, complete with appropriate seasonal apparition.

And there you have it - our favorite recommendations for everyone on your list. Be sure to check out our Gift Guide page for some project tutorials that will make your holidays extra bright, as well as our curated list of the best products to get you started!

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MagPi issue 26

via Raspberry Pi

I’m in a bit of a rush today; we’re all at the factory in Wales where the Raspberry Pi is built to show the team that works in Cambridge how to make a Pi. So I’ll hand over to Team MagPi, who have just released their 26th edition of the free monthly Raspberry Pi magazine, written by Raspberry Pi fans for Raspberry Pi fans.

Screen Shot 2014-11-18 at 14.17.27

Editor Ash Stone says:

This month’s Issue is packed with hardware and programming articles.  We are pleased to present the first article in an OpenCV (open source computer vision) image recognition software series by Derek Campbell.  The robot that Derek used to test the software configuration is shown on this month’s cover.

Expanding the I/O possibilities of the Raspberry Pi is often a first step of electronics projects.  This time, Dougie Lawson presents a review of the Arduberry board from Dexter Industries.  This little board provides an ideal microcontroller interface for more complicated electronics projects.  This month’s hardware articles are rounded off by Karl-Ludwig’s third BitScope article, which includes examples of preamplifier circuits and associated test and measurement.

The Raspberry Pi provides the opportunity to run many different software applications.  Voice over IP (VoIP) allows telephone calls to be carried over an internet connection.  Walbarto Abad continues his mini-series by describing how to setup an Asterisk VoIP server.

The second application article this month continues the discussion of git (distributed version control system).  Git was originally produced for Linux kernel development, but is now a mainstay of many different development projects and has been adopted by several schools too.  Alec Clews leads us through his second tutorial on the subject.

This month’s programming article demonstrates how to build an arcade game using FUZE BASIC.  Jon Silvera includes instructions, code and images to build a horizontally scrolling game.

We are on the look out for more articles at all levels and on all subjects.  If you are interested in submitting an article, please get in touch with us by emailing articles@themagpi.com.

If you have any other comments, you can find us on Twitter (@TheMagP1) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/MagPiMagazine) too.

 

 

Harmonic Analyzer Mechanical Fourier Computer

via Hackaday » hardware

If you’re into mechanical devices or Fourier series (or both!), you’ve got some serious YouTubing to do.

[The Engineer Guy] has posted up a series of four videos (Introduction, Synthesis, Analysis, and Operation) that demonstrate the operation and theory behind a 100-year-old machine that does Fourier analysis and synthesis with gears, cams, rocker-arms, and springs.

In Synthesis, [The Engineer Guy] explains how the machine creates an arbitrary waveform from its twenty Fourier components. In retrospect, if you’re up on your Fourier synthesis, it’s pretty obvious. Gears turn at precise ratios to each other to create the relative frequencies, and circles turning trace out sine or cosine waves easily enough. But the mechanical spring-weighted summation mechanism blew our mind, and watching the machine do its thing is mesmerizing.

In Analysis everything runs in reverse. [The Engineer Guy] sets some sample points — a square wave — into the machine and it spits out the Fourier coefficients. If you don’t have a good intuitive feel for the duality implied by Fourier analysis and synthesis, go through the video from 1:50 to 2:20 again. For good measure, [The Engineer Guy] then puts the resulting coefficient estimates back into the machine, and you get to watch a bunch of gears and springs churn out a pretty good square wave. Truly amazing.

The fact that the machine was designed by [Albert Michelson], of Michelson-Morley experiment fame, adds some star power. [The Engineer Guy] is selling a book documenting the machine, and his video about the book is probably worth your time as well. And if you still haven’t gotten enough sine-wavey goodness, watch the bonus track where he runs the machine in slow-mo: pure mechano-mathematical hotness!


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