Tag Archives: robot

R2-D2 build

via Dangerous Prototypes

r2d2-4

Bithead942 blogged about his R2-D2 build:

To really bring R2-D2 to life, I knew I had to do some great sturff with electronics.  I started with a Taranis X9D controller and a pair of X8R receivers configured for a full 16-channels.  I chose this platform mainly for its versatility, but also because I wanted to have separate control of the head and body with one remote controller (so the head can spin a full 360 degrees without tangling the wires).

Project info at Bithead’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

You’re a (chess) wizard, Bethanie

via Raspberry Pi

By recreating the iconic Wizard’s Chess set from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (sorry America, it’s Philosopher, not Sorcerer), 18-year-old Jambassador Bethanie Fentiman has become my new hero.

wizard's chess

Ron, you don’t suppose this is going to be like… ‘real’ wizard’s chess, do you?

Playing on an idea she’d had last year, Bethanie decided to recreate the chess board from the book/movie as part of her A-Level coursework (putting everything I ever created at school to utter shame), utilising the knowledge and support of her fellow Jammers from the Kent Raspberry Jam community.

After searching through the internet for inspiration, she stumbled upon an Instructables guide for building an Arduino-powered chess robot, which gave her a basis on which to build her system of stepper motors, drawer runners, gears, magnets, and so on.

Wizard's Chess

Harry Potter and the ‘it’s almost complete’ Wizard’s Chess board

The next issue she faced in her quest for ultimate wizarding glory was to figure out how to actually play chess! Without any chess-playing knowhow, Bethanie either needed to learn quickly or…cheat a bit. So she looked up the legal moves of each piece, coding them into the programme, therefore allowing her to move on with the project without the need to monotonously learn the rules to the game. 

wizard's chess

Hermione would never approve.

There were a few snags along the way, mainly due to problems with measuring. But once assembled, everything was looking good.

Wizard's Chess

We’ve got our fingers crossed that Bethanie replaces the pieces in time with some battling replicas from the movie.

On a minimal budget, Bethanie procured her chess pieces from a local charity shop, managing to get the board itself laser-cut for free, thanks to her school’s technology department.

Now complete, the board has begun its own ‘Wizard Chess Tour’, visiting various Raspberry Jams across the country. Its first stop was in Harlow, and more recently, Bethanie has taken the board to the August Covent Garden Jam.

Wizard's Chess gif

MAGIC!

You can find out more about the Wizard’s Chess board via the Kent Jams Twitter account and website. And you’d like the board to visit your own Raspberry Jam event… send Bethanie word by owl and see what she says!

l5XXMbH

The post You’re a (chess) wizard, Bethanie appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Jumping robot leg

via Dangerous Prototypes

Ben Katz documented his robotic leg project:

Here are the python scripts that send serial commands to the motor controllers.
Here are the eagle files, gerbers, and BOM for the motor controllers and sensor boards. When I sent the boards to 3PCB, the text the motor controllers got all scrambled so keep that in mind. At this point I’ve built up three of each board, and they all work. I haven’t even blown up a single FET yet, in all of my motor control derping so far.
Here are my CAD files for the motor, gearbox, motor module, and leg. Requires Solidworks 2015-2016 to open. Many of the gearbox files have HSMWorks CAM in them, so you’ll need the full version of HSMWorks to view the CAM. There’s also a list of the gears I got from KHK and the post-machining I did on them.

Full details at BuildIts in Progress blog.

 

the easiest educational robot for kids, Mbot, goes AtHeart

via Arduino Blog

mbloc

It’s cute, it’s fun and easy to assemble, it’s mBot by Makebloc, the new educational robot joining Arduino AtHeart program!

mBot it’s an all-in-one solution for kids and beginners to enjoy the hands-on experience about robotics, programming, and electronics.

You can program it with drag-and-drop graphical programming software based on Scratch 2.0 and the magic happens: the robots can follow lines, kick balls and push objects, avoid walls and more. You can also switch from graphical to text-based programming in Arduino mode as it can be coded with Arduino IDE environment.

Watch the video of their successful Kickstarter campaign:

mBot supports wireless communication, standard Arduino boards like Arduino Uno, Leonardo boards, Arduino Nano, Arduino Mega 2560, Makeblock mCore (based on Arduino Uno).

The main control board’s design, mCore of mBot, is based on Arduino UNO: with intuitional color labels and easy-to-use RJ25 connectors, the board can get wired easily so students can then get more time to focus on creating all kinds of interactive stories and projects.

To help teachers, parents, and kids get started easier and faster the robot kit has two free tutorial e-books and online manuals are provided and increasing continually.

Take a look at mBot on Makeblock website and discover how to use 2.4GHz wireless module and Bluetooth module with mBot:

the easiest educational robot for kids, Mbot, goes AtHeart

via Arduino Blog

mbloc

It’s cute, it’s fun and easy to assemble, it’s mBot by Makebloc, the new educational robot joining Arduino AtHeart program!

mBot it’s an all-in-one solution for kids and beginners to enjoy the hands-on experience about robotics, programming, and electronics.

You can program it with drag-and-drop graphical programming software based on Scratch 2.0 and the magic happens: the robots can follow lines, kick balls and push objects, avoid walls and more. You can also switch from graphical to text-based programming in Arduino mode as it can be coded with Arduino IDE environment.

Watch the video of their successful Kickstarter campaign:

mBot supports wireless communication, standard Arduino boards like Arduino Uno, Leonardo boards, Arduino Nano, Arduino Mega 2560, Makeblock mCore (based on Arduino Uno).

The main control board’s design, mCore of mBot, is based on Arduino UNO: with intuitional color labels and easy-to-use RJ25 connectors, the board can get wired easily so students can then get more time to focus on creating all kinds of interactive stories and projects.

To help teachers, parents, and kids get started easier and faster the robot kit has two free tutorial e-books and online manuals are provided and increasing continually.

Take a look at mBot on Makeblock website and discover how to use 2.4GHz wireless module and Bluetooth module with mBot:

Watch a fin-propelled underwater robot prototype

via Arduino Blog

underwaterRobot

The robotic prototype swimming under water propelled by fins, it was developed at the Control Systems and Robotics Laboratory of the Technological Educational Institute of Crete, in Heraklion (Greece) and it’s controlled by an Arduino Mega:

Each fin is comprised of three individually actuated fin rays, which are interconnected by an elastic membrane. An on-board microcontroller generates the rays’ motion pattern that result in the fins’ undulations, through which propulsion is obtained. The prototype, which is fully untethered and energetically autonomous, also integrates an IMU/AHRS unit for navigation purposes, a wireless communication module, and an on-board video camera. The video contains footage from experiments conducted in a laboratory test tank to investigate closed loop motion control strategies, as well as footage from sea trials.

the Arduino runs a custom-developed real time firmware that implements two Central Pattern Generator (CPG) networks to generate the undulatory motion profile for the robot’s fins. The robot  contains a  7.4V lipo battery powering also a Bluetooth module for wireless communication and a video camera to record footage of the missions.

UnderwaterRobot2