Tag Archives: usb

Sinilink WIFI-USB mobile remote controller

via Dangerous Prototypes

Peter Scargill blogged about his AliExpress Sinilink WIFI USB controller project:

So here’s a thing – I had this all set up and working perfectly with Tasmota on my WiFi – then plugged the unit (USB male end) into a USB3 connector – and it immediately lost the lot – well, the settings, not Tasmota – I had to go back to using my mobile phone as an access point and re-enter the info. That’s annoying but the reset after USB3 plugin might be related to somehow triggering the “normal” Tasmota device recovery, which indeed does a “factory reset”. So what I did next after advice from subscriber “sfromis”, was to use “SetOption65 1” in Tasmota console (which is a non-volatile setting) and I’ve had no trouble since – on the same USB3 hub.

More details on Scargill’s Tech Blog.

Check out the video after the break.

App note: USB hardware and PCB guidelines using STM32 MCUs

via Dangerous Prototypes

Peripheral USB on STM32 MCUs app note from STMicroelectronics. Link here (PDF)

STM32 microcontrollers include a group of products embedding a USB (Universal Serial Bus) peripheral. Full-speed and high-speed operations are provided through embedded and/or external PHYs (physical layers of the open system interconnection model).

This application note gives an overview of the USB peripherals implemented on STM32 MCUs, and provides hardware guidelines for PCB design, to ensure electrical compliance with the USB standards.

The Annoying CAPS LOCK warning buzzer

via Dangerous Prototypes

Glen Akins made a USB notification device that make annoying warning noise when CAPS LOCK is enabled:

The only way to make CAPS LOCK even more annoying was to make it audible! Now never type a password in all upper case, join 500 lines together in vi, or turn a harmless forum post into an ANGRY SCREED without warning again! This project uses a PIC16F1459 to monitor the USB output report containing the CAPS LOCK status from the connected PC. When CAPS LOCK is enabled, the PIC turns on an annoying warning buzzer.

Project details at bikerglen.com, see Part 1 here. All design files are available on github.

UPDI Programmer Stick

via Dangerous Prototypes

Johnson Davies designed and built this UPDI Programmer Stick based on an ATmega328P, that is available on GitHub:

This is a USB-stick sized UPDI programmer, for programming Microchip’s new 0-series and 1-series ATtiny chips from the Arduino IDE
It’s based on an ATmega328P, and is essentially an Arduino Uno on a USB stick, so you also could use it as a mini-sized Arduino Uno.

Project details at technoblogy.com.

4 Port high power USB hub

via Dangerous Prototypes

Dilshan Jayakody has published a new build:

In the last couple of years, I tried several powered USB hubs to drive some development boards and USB peripherals. Most of the USB hubs which we can find in the local market are unreliable or not designed to drive more than 500mA of a load.
After having a few bad experiences with powered USB hubs, I decided to build a USB hub by myself. I specifically design this hub to drive USB powered development boards and experimental peripherals.

See the full post on his blog.