Tag Archives: usb

The Annoying CAPS LOCK warning buzzer

via Dangerous Prototypes

Glen Akins made a USB notification device that make annoying warning noise when CAPS LOCK is enabled:

The only way to make CAPS LOCK even more annoying was to make it audible! Now never type a password in all upper case, join 500 lines together in vi, or turn a harmless forum post into an ANGRY SCREED without warning again! This project uses a PIC16F1459 to monitor the USB output report containing the CAPS LOCK status from the connected PC. When CAPS LOCK is enabled, the PIC turns on an annoying warning buzzer.

Project details at bikerglen.com, see Part 1 here. All design files are available on github.

UPDI Programmer Stick

via Dangerous Prototypes

Johnson Davies designed and built this UPDI Programmer Stick based on an ATmega328P, that is available on GitHub:

This is a USB-stick sized UPDI programmer, for programming Microchip’s new 0-series and 1-series ATtiny chips from the Arduino IDE
It’s based on an ATmega328P, and is essentially an Arduino Uno on a USB stick, so you also could use it as a mini-sized Arduino Uno.

Project details at technoblogy.com.

4 Port high power USB hub

via Dangerous Prototypes

Dilshan Jayakody has published a new build:

In the last couple of years, I tried several powered USB hubs to drive some development boards and USB peripherals. Most of the USB hubs which we can find in the local market are unreliable or not designed to drive more than 500mA of a load.
After having a few bad experiences with powered USB hubs, I decided to build a USB hub by myself. I specifically design this hub to drive USB powered development boards and experimental peripherals.

See the full post on his blog.

BUS PIRATE: Love the USB C connector!

via Dangerous Prototypes

Bus Pirate prototype Ultra v1b uses a common, cheap USB C connector and we are in love!

Micro B connectors are a nightmare. Very inconsistent footprints, poor materials and build quality, and very weak mounting supports. Often the leads are hidden under the housing and conceal pesky shorts. Almost every Micro B connector we hand soldered eventually broke off the board and usually took some traces with it.

USB C solved all these issues! Soldering it is an absolute breeze. Leads are easily accessible and friendly to solder. It’s made of decent materials, and the footprint seems to be pretty standardized across the market. The mounting posts are solid and strong, this connector isn’t going anywhere.

Here’s how we connected it on the v1b hardware. The footprint was made by Sjaak at SMDprutser and is in our git repo.

Building a giant USB three key mechanical keyboard

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Glen Akins shares his latest build the giant three key USB keyboard:

After seeing this giant mechanical keyboard at Adafruit, I decided I had to build my own. Adafruit made theirs out of wood and used one of their Python-compatible microcontroller boards. I wanted a sloped top on my keyboard. I also wanted to check out what was new with Microchip’s USB device stack. I decided to build my keyboard out of aluminum and use a PIC18 microcontroller.

See the full post on his blog here, Photons, Electrons, and Dirt.

Tiny, isolated USB to Xcvr interface (PTT, Audio, CAT, …)

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Mare writes:

I will describe here the USB interface between the radio station and the computer which I recently developed and tested. This post is a continuation of the first part, where I described a simple interface for controlling two digital lines using the USB / Serial Converter, where I presented simple interface to control two digital signals (e.g. Ptzt and CW). This time I will describe an interface that combines more functions:

  • Controlling several digital (switching) inputs and outputs
  • Interface for controlling the station via the serial interface
  • Audio input and output interface (sound card)

More details at Mare & Gal Electronics site.