Tag Archives: avr

MCP4141 based digital potentiometer

via Dangerous Prototypes

Dilshan Jayakody has been working on an open-source hardware project MCP4141 based digital potentiometer, that is available on GitHub:

The main objective of this project is to create an experimental prototype of a digital potentiometer using Microchip’s MCP4141 IC. MCP4141 is available with end-to-end resistances of 5KΩ, 10KΩ, 50kΩ, and 100KΩ. This potentiometer-module can drive MCP4141 with any of the above mention resistances.

AVR high voltage programmer 2

via Dangerous Prototypes

Dilshan Jayakody posted an update on his AVR high voltage programmer project we covered previously:

AVR-HV2 is Arduino based high voltage parallel programmer for AVR microcontrollers. This programmer can read, write, and erase both flash memory and EEPROM. Also, this can use to set fuse bits of AVR MCUs. Compare with the previous version of AVR HVPP, this design is based on commonly available components with a simple schematic. In this release driver software is also rewritten to provide cross-platform support.

More details on Dilshan Jayakody’s blog. The design files are available on GitHub.

Building a better bit-bang UART – picoUART

via Dangerous Prototypes

Ralph Doncaster writes, ” The screen shot above is from picoUART running on an ATtiny13, at a baud rate of 230.4kbps. The new UART has several improvements over my old code. To understand the improvements, it helps to understand how an asynchronous serial TTL UART works first. Most embedded systems use 81N communication, which means 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity. Each frame begins with a low start bit, so the total frame is 1 start bit + 8 data bits + 1 stop bit for a total of 10 bits. Frames can be sent back-to-back with no idle time between them. The data is sent at a fixed baud rate, and when either the receiver or transmitter varies from the chosen baud rate, errors can occur.

See the full post on Nerd Ralph blog.

An ATmega brushless sensored motor driver v02

via Dangerous Prototypes

David Gironi writes, “Brushless electric motor (BLDC motors) are synchronous motors that are powered by a DC electric source via an integrated inverter/switching power supply, which produces an AC electric signal to drive the motor. Hall sensored motors uses hall effect sensors or a rotary encoder to directly measure the rotor’s position.

See the full post on David’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

An ATmega brushless sensorless motor driver v02

via Dangerous Prototypes

Davide Gironi has posted an update on his ATmega brushless sensorless motor driver project we covered previously:

Brushless electric motor (BLDC motors) are synchronous motors that are powered by a DC electric source via an integrated inverter/switching power supply, which produces an AC electric signal to drive the motor.

See the full post on his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

Drive an MCP49XX series DAC with an AVR ATmega

via Dangerous Prototypes

Davide Gironi writes:

Driving that IC is pretty simple, expecially if you have a dedicated SPI hardware interface, like many microchip has.
The ATmega8, used in this example has a dedicated SPI Control Register (SPSR) that one can use to setup the SPI interface.
This library can drive more then one MCP49XX of the same series at the same time, this is done just by selecting the chip using a SS channel for each one.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.