Tag Archives: ESP8266

Multipurpose ESP8266 keychain

via hardware – Hackaday

One of the best feature of the ESP8266 is it’s ability to self-host a web server, allowing for fairly complicated user interactions. The dEEbugger by [S-March] is a nifty little ESP8266 based device with a plethora of features in a small package.

The USB-powered device has a web user interface that enables it to be used as a low bandwidth oscilloscope, I2C terminal, or UART terminal. As an scope, you may connect to it via your tablet and then use it as a remote voltage monitor. There is a peak detection feature which is a nice touch and gives the entire project a premium feel.

The serial terminal on an ESP8266 is not something new yet it is helpful in disconnecting the console window from the bench. The I2C terminal is where the device really shines as it can scan for connected devices on the connected bus. This bus pirate like feature is useful for beginners as the software can scan the registers addresses of the devices as well.

[S-March] has made the schematic in PDF format as well as the entire code for the project available on GitHub so go right ahead and make it your own. We have had an ESP8266 based VT Terminal device in the past and merging the two would make for an excellent maker tool.

Thanks for the tip [René Arts]


Filed under: hardware

Pulsecounting and deepsleep based IoT water meter

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Tisham Dhar has written an article detailing his pulsecounting and deepsleep based IoT water meter project:

I admit to being a tiny bit obsessed with monitoring utility bills and gathering data on my usage patterns blow-by-blow. The energy monitoring has reduced my electricity bills, so I wanted to have a go at the water usage. Granted a lot of the water bill is fixed supply costs and sewerage charges which I can’t do much about.
A while ago I made some pulse counting breakouts with the DS1682+ RTC. I have finally got a chance to put them to good use interfacing with my mechanical water meter. The water meter has a spinning permanent magnet and in principle this can trigger a reed switch and generate pulses for accumulation by the RTC.

More details at Tisham Dhar’s blog.

Duck DNS ESP8266 mini WiFi client

via Dangerous Prototypes

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An ESP8266 Duck DNS client from Davide Gironi:

It is powered by USB, it can also be powered by the router USB port.
It’s built on a pretty old ESP-01 board.
It has two led, one is the ESP-01 WiFi connection status embedded one, the other is connected to the GPIO2 port, and it’s used for the DNS update status.

Project info at Davide Gironi’s blog.  Code is available on github.

Check out the video after the break.

Sir, It Appears We’ve Been Jammed!

via hardware – Hackaday

In a move that would induce ire in Lord Helmet, [Kedar Nimbalkar] has hacked together a simple — yet effective — WiFi jammer that comes with a handful of features certain to frustrate whomever has provoked its wrath.

The jammer is an ESP8266 development board — running some additional custom code — accessed and controlled by a cell phone. From the interface, [Nimbalkar] is able to target a WiFi network and boot all the devices off the network by de-authenticating them. Another method is to flood the airspace with bogus SSIDs to make connecting to a valid network a drawn-out affair.

This kind of signal interruption is almost certainly illegal where you live. It does no permanent damage, but once again raises the existing deauth exploit and SSID loophole. [Nimbalkar]’s purpose in building this was for educational purposes and to highlight weaknesses in 802.11 WiFi protocols. The 802.11w standard should alleviate some of our fake deauth woes by using protected frames. Once the device authenticates on a network it will be able to detect fake deauth packets.

We featured a more targeted version of this hack that can be done using a PC — even targeting itself! And more recently there was a version that can target specific devices by jumping on the ACK.

[Thanks for the tip, Itay!]


Filed under: hardware, wireless hacks

Display time on a 1950s multimeter

via Arduino Blog

Given an input and some sort of indicator, is there any device that can’t be hacked into a timepiece? With the help of an Arduino Nano and an ESP8266 module, Guilio Pons has created a unique clock out of a 1950s-era multimeter.

Pons’ project not only displays time with an indicator originally meant to reveal electrical values, but is also able to output sounds as needed using a speaker recovered from an old toy. He integrated three LEDs as well as a PIR sensor, so the unit can light up at night.

PWM control from the Arduino takes care of moving the gauge, while the ESP8266 allows the time to be synchronized via the Internet and the alarm adjusted over WiFi.

Want to retrofit a vintage tester of your own? Be sure to check out Pons’ entire log on Hackaday.io. You can find the software library that he used to play sounds here.