Tag Archives: Featured

Together, let’s make COVID-19 history – CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT

via Arduino Blog

Combating COVID-19 Conference: A Collaborative Arduino Community Initiative to take place on April 2nd at 5pm CET

To the Arduino community:

Humanity is facing one of the most trying events in its history and as technologists, makers and designers we are asking ourselves how can we help. 

How can we contribute to the efforts to save lives, to help our fellow human beings?

All of us have been thinking about this and observing what is going on in the world.

We have seen communities, including all of you, trying to design devices that would help hospitals cope with the lack of equipment; we’ve seen people firing up their imagination and their 3D printers in an effort to build something that could save even a single human life.

Having noticed that a large number of these efforts are using Arduino technology we reached out to a number of these communities to offer our help, donate some hardware, provide engineering support, and do whatever we can considering that we are a small company.

One thing that was striking to us is the large amount of duplication in the work people are doing. Many people are spending valuable time trying to overcome similar challenges in their design, rather than sharing their solution to the benefit of all and moving on to the next hurdle. Also, there are different teams with different strengths and skill sets that would be better working together than apart.

We must do better, be more effective, work together, and merge efforts to solve these problems and reach our common goal quicker and more efficiently.

Because of all of this, we want to invite as many of these projects as possible to an online gathering, to get people talking, to offer help on how to design and make hardware, how to think about the software, and how to scale manufacturing (we would like to share our knowledge in making tens of thousands of open source boards per week). Finally and most importantly, we must take guidance from medical professionals so that they can steer requirements and validate the designs so our efforts have the most positive impact. 

Join us online on April 2nd to understand how we can work together to do better together, and together let’s make COVID-19 history.

— David Cuartielles and Massimo Banzi, Arduino co-founders (on behalf of Arduino)


Combating COVID-19 Conference: A Collaborative Arduino Community Initiative will take place on April 2nd at 5pm CET.

This is an open invitation to anyone currently using Arduino-compatible devices within a project to design and manufacture ventilators, respirators or other devices to combat COVID-19. Be you a doctor, an academic, a professional company/researcher or an innovator, you are more than welcome to join the conference. 

The conference will be hosted in Zoom (link available soon), with the ability to interact with Arduino and other members on the conference via Discord (free download here). 

There are different ways to participate in the conference: you can present your Arduino-based solution to tackle COVID-19, support other community projects, or provide expert advice — we are all stronger together.

(N.B. If you want to present and share your project, please complete this form by 12:00 (noon) CET on April 2nd.)

More information on the conference will be available soon. In the meantime, you can learn more about Arduino’s overall response to COVID-19 emergency here.

1,156 LEDs make up these dual acrylic light-up panels

via Arduino Blog

What does one do with over 1,000 LEDs, white acrylic, and 288 IR sensors? If you’re Redditor “jordy_essen,” you create an interactive light panel.

In one mode, the user pull a reflective tool across the sensors to draw a paths, with potentiometers implemented to select the color. It can also be set up to play a sort of whack-a-mole game, where one has to activate the sensor in the same area where it illuminates.

For this amazing device, jordy_essen uses not one, or even two, but six Arduino Mega boards to drive the LEDs directly — in turn controlled by a webpage running on a Raspberry Pi. If that wasn’t enough hardware, an Uno is tasked with taking inputs from the color potentiometers. 

It’s a brilliant project in any sense of the word!

Arduino’s response to the Covid-19 outbreak

via Arduino Blog

For the latest update regarding Arduino’s response to the Covid-19 outbreak please click here.

Priority Service for the Design & Production of Essential Medical and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

As companies around the globe rapidly react to governments’ calls to produce critical medical equipment like ventilators and PPE, Arduino is prioritizing stock allocation for these urgent needs.

If your company urgently requires any Arduino hardware or software to facilitate the prototyping and production of any equipment or solution to lessen the impact of Covid-19 please contact us.

A dedicated team will work to ensure we support your needs through ensuring the fastest possible delivery (either directly or via sub-distribution) and/or expediting production as required. We will also provide increased levels of design support and help for those designing such critical equipment. 

Tune in to the official Arduino Day 2020 livestream

via Arduino Blog

We’re just hours away from (virtually) celebrating Arduino Day! Join us on Saturday for our official livestream, starting at 2pm CET. We’ll connect with community events from all around the world as well as hear from Arduino team members like Fabio Violante, Massimo Banzi, and David Cuartielles.

Be sure to set a reminder and tune in!

Work remotely with Arduino Create — get a free upgrade now

via Arduino Blog

To help individuals work remotely and share their designs with team members, we’re providing a free three-month upgrade to the Arduino Create Maker plan to all 1.4 million users of Create as well as new subscribers to the service. With Arduino Create everything is ready to go; there is no need to install libraries and you can quickly share your sketch with teammates via just a URL. 

To gain your free three-month upgrade* all you need to do is go to Arduino Create choose the “Maker” plan with the default monthly option and enter the voucher code “CREATE4FREE” during the purchase process.

Arduino Create enables users to write code, access content, configure boards and share projects. Features such as an always up-to-date online IDE and the ability to share builds and receive feedback from other facilities means you can work from home efficiently and effectively. If you don’t want to start a project from scratch there’s always the option to tap into the power of the community on the Arduino Project Hub by browsing projects and making them your own. 

The ‘Maker’ plan comes with the added benefits of up to 250 sketches allowed in your sketchbook along with 200MB space to store those sketches and libraries. You can manage more connected objects (five ‘things’) with up to 20 properties per ‘thing,’ enabling the development of complete IoT solutions. Automating processes remotely is further enabled by the Maker plan including access to set up and remotely control 5 of each cloud enabled Arduino board, three cloud-enabled Linux devices, and one cloud-enabled generic third-party board.

Find out more details about Arduino Create and all the features included in the Maker plan here.

*The ‘free 3-month upgrade to Create Maker is applicable to the monthly plan and is limited to new subscribers only. Voucher code “CREATE4FREE” expires June 30th, 2020. 

Please note the first monthly payment will start three months after you purchase the plan, and you are able to cancel your subscription at any time.

VersaTouch brings touch localization and force sensing to everyday surfaces

via Arduino Blog

Researchers from the University of Auckland in New Zealand’s are exploring a new way to construct interactive touch surfaces using finger-mounted audio transducers. 

VersaTouch — which works on everyday surfaces — uses one or more receivers to measure sound waves emanating from the wearer’s “augmented” fingers, allowing it to calculate their positions and/or movements. The plug-and-play system can also sense force based on a changing audio signature and track individual digits by alternating each one’s sonic outputs. 

Importantly, VersaTouch can be configured without permanent modification to the newly interactive surface. The setup includes an Arduino Due to receive signals, a Teensy 3.6 to control the transducers, and a MacBook to process the data and calculate the touch positions with a Java program.

More information on the project can be found in the team’s research paper, and you can see it demonstrated in the video below. 

VersaTouch is a portable, plug-and-play system that uses active acoustic sensing to track fine-grained touch locations as well as touch force of multiple fingers on everyday surfaces without having to permanently instrument them or do an extensive calibration. Our system is versatile in multiple aspects. First, with simple calibration, VersaTouch can be arranged in arbitrary layouts in order to fit into crowded surfaces while retaining its accuracy. Second, various modalities of touch input, such as distance and position, can be supported depending on the number of sensors used to suit the interaction scenario. Third, VersaTouch can sense multi-finger touch, touch force, as well as identify the touch source. Last, VersaTouch is capable of providing vibrotactile feedback to fingertips through the same actuators used for touch sensing.