Tag Archives: MKR Zero

The Nespresso Shield logs your coffee consumption using a MKR Zero

via Arduino Blog

How much coffee do you consume in a day? No idea? Then the Nespresso Shield by Steadman Thompson may be just what you need!

The device employs an Arduino MKR Zero, and a microphone unit to sense when a Nespresso machine gets louder than a certain threshold. When this level is met, it knows that a drink is being prepared and records this on the board’s built-in SD card reader. Info is coordinated with RTC values, allowing the card to be pulled in order to produce nice graphs in Excel or LibreCalc.

It also keeps track of water levels, based on how many cups have been poured, with a reset button and LED as the user interface. The unit simply sits on top of the machine, so there’s no modification needed whatsoever. 

The post The Nespresso Shield logs your coffee consumption using a MKR Zero appeared first on Arduino Blog.

A MKR ZERO-based volume controller for your PC

via Arduino Blog

While some keyboards provide media keys or even knobs to adjust your overall computer sound up and down, often what you really want is the ability to tune program volumes separately. To make this extremely easy, SNR Tech Bytes has come up with a beautifully-designed controller, which runs on the MKR ZERO.

The device features five encoders to individually tune the master volume, Discord, Chrome, gaming, and Spotify, with the help of software on the PC itself. Encoder button mutes each channel as needed, using NeoPixels below to indicate each status.

The build is based on the deej volume mixer, and more specifics on this version are available on GitHub.

Recreating Rosie the Robot with a MKR ZERO

via Arduino Blog

While 2020 may seem like a very futuristic year, we still don’t have robotic maids like the Jetsons’ Rosie the Robot. For his latest element14 Presents project, DJ Harrigan decided to create such a bot as a sort of animatronic character, using an ESP8266 board for interface and overall control, and a MKR ZERO to play stored audio effects.

The device features a moveable head, arms and eyes, and even has a very clever single-servo gear setup to open and close its mouth.

UI is via smartphone running a Blynk app, and Rosie’s antennas can light up along with a “beep beep” sound to let you know it needs your attention!

More details can be found in Harrigan’s post here.