Tag Archives: Open Source

Hackaday Prize Entry: MappyDot, a Micro Smart LiDAR Sensor

via hardware – Hackaday

[Blecky]’s entry to the Hackaday Prize is MappyDot, a tiny board less than a square inch in size that holds a VL53L0X time-of-flight distance sensor and can measure distances of up to 2 meters.

MappyDot is more than just a breakout board; the ATMega328PB microcontroller on each PCB provides filtering, an easy to use  I2C interface, and automatically handles up to 112 boards connected in a bus. The idea is that one or a few MappyDots can be used by themselves, but managing a large number is just as easy. By dotting a device with multiple MappyDots pointing in different directions, a device could combine the readings to gain a LiDAR-like understanding of its physical environment. Its big numbers of MappyDots [Blecky] is going for, too: he just received a few panels of bare PCBs that he’ll soon be laboriously populating. The good news is, there aren’t that many components on each board.

It’s great to see open sourced projects and tools in which it is clear some thought has gone into making them flexible and easy to use. This means they are easier to incorporate into other work and helps make them a great contestant for the Hackaday Prize.


Filed under: hardware, The Hackaday Prize

An open source rain and humidity sensor couple

via Dangerous Prototypes

1sensor

Boris Landoni writes about a new open source rain and humidity sensor project:

It detects humidity through two sensors which are to be used alternatively to let us know when there is water on the ground because it’s raining, or when the water level in a flowerpot is too low and it needs watering.

See the full post and more details on his blog, Open Electronics.

HydroBot: Prototyping new modules

via Dangerous Prototypes

ProtoModule-600x400

Matthew Reed writes:

ProtoModule is a HydroBot module designed to easily develop and test new monitoring or control functions that may someday go into a HydroBot module. It has 11 GPIO pins and the power rails broken out on a 0.1” pin header for easy breadboarding or interfacing with ribbon cables. The provided pins give access to a variety of digital and analog I/O, as well as digital communication peripherals, to allow for many flexible design options.

More info at protofusion.org.

8-bit assembler compiler project

via Dangerous Prototypes

8-bit assembler compiler

Dilshan Jayakody writes, “8-bit Assembler compiler is NASM compatible assembler compiler to generate binaries for 8-bit x86 like CPUs. The binaries produced with this compiler can execute on Marco Schweighauser’s 8-bit virtual Javascript CPU.
This native compiler can build using Lazarus / FPC. During the implementation we build and test this compiler successfully on Linux and Windows operating systems.”

More details at Dilshan Jayakody’s blog.

8-bit assembler compiler project

via Dangerous Prototypes

8-bit assembler compiler

Dilshan Jayakody writes, “8-bit Assembler compiler is NASM compatible assembler compiler to generate binaries for 8-bit x86 like CPUs. The binaries produced with this compiler can execute on Marco Schweighauser’s 8-bit virtual Javascript CPU.
This native compiler can build using Lazarus / FPC. During the implementation we build and test this compiler successfully on Linux and Windows operating systems.”

More details at Dilshan Jayakody’s blog.

A 2-channel receiver that can save your old Motorola TX

via Dangerous Prototypes

1featured-2

Boris Landoni writes about a new open source project 2-channel receiver that can save your old Motorola TX:

A 433,92 MHz Receiver that can be paired with a maximum of 10 Motorola TX each with relay outputs that can be set both in monostable or bistable mode.

Although we have had high security encoding for several years, based for instance on rolling-codes, a lot of remote controls and especially those installed long time ago in houses and other places for opening gates, are based on fixed and relatively simple encoding like the MM53200 of former National Semiconductor and the Motorola MC14502x; the latter had two new elements at the time of its introduction, that were the high (for the times) number of combinations allowed (19,683) and the three-state encoding (each encoding input of the encoder and of the decoder would allow three logic levels and required special three-state dip-switches).

More details at open-electronics.org.