Tag Archives: Uncategorized

Ophthalmoscope: Saving eyes with Raspberry Pis

via Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is being used to save the eyesight of people in India thanks to the Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope (OIO) project. 

Inside the OIO, machine learning technology is used to spot eye problems. Subsequently, the OIO becomes better at checking for problems over long-term use.

“The Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope is a portable retinal camera that uses machine learning to make diagnosis not only affordable but also accurate and reliable,” says Sandeep Vempati, a mechanical engineer at the Srujana Center for Innovation, a part of the L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI).

The heart of the OIO is a Raspberry Pi. Our low-cost computer drives down the cost of taking high-quality photos of the retina.

“Currently, visual impairment affects 285 million people worldwide,” said Sandeep. “What’s more surprising is the fact that 80 percent of all visual impairment can be prevented or cured, if diagnosed correctly.”

Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope (OIO)

An open-source, ultra-low cost, portable screening device for retinal diseases. OIO(OWL) is an idea conceived in Srujana Innovation Centre at the L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. It is an open source retinal image capturing device with dynamic diabetic retinopathy grading system.

“India is the diabetes capital of the world,” explained Dr Jay Chhablani, a specialist in retinal disease at the LVPEI. “Diabetes leads to something called diabetic retinopathy”.

For that reason, it’s important to remove barriers to treatment. “If we see the patient at an early stage,” says Dr Chhablani, “we can treat them by controlling diabetes and applying laser treatment”.

“Although eye care services have become increasingly available,” said Sandeep, “diagnosing diseases like diabetic retinopathy is still a problem in many parts of the world.”

Sandeep’s team strove to build an open device. As a result, OIO can be 3D printed and assembled anywhere in the world.

Open Direct Ophthalmoscope

Inside the Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope project

“3D printing creates the OIO for a fraction of the cost of conventional devices, and yet maintains the same quality,” explains Sandeep.

Compared to professional devices, the OIO costs just $800 to build. In contrast, professional retinal cameras can cost around ten times as much.

Over on OIO’s Hackaday page you will find the components. Inside is a Raspberry Pi 3, a Camera Module, a 20 dioptre lens, front-end mirrors, and a 5-inch touchscreen.

“Engineering feels great when you see a product being useful in the real world,” says Sandeep.

The post Ophthalmoscope: Saving eyes with Raspberry Pis appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Fix Dirty COW on the Raspberry Pi

via Raspberry Pi

Hi gang, Rob from The MagPi here. We have a new issue out on Thursday but before that, here comes a PSA.

You may have seen the news recently about a bug in the Linux kernel called Dirty COW – it’s a vulnerability that affects the ‘copy-on-write’ mechanism in Linux, which is also known as COW. This bug can be used to gain full control over a device running a version of Linux, including Android phones, web servers, and even the Raspberry Pi.

We're not sure why a bug got a logo but we're running with it

We’re not sure why a bug got a logo but we’re running with it

You don’t need to worry though, as a patch for Raspbian Jessie to fix Dirty COW has already been released, and you can get it right now. Open up a terminal window and type the following:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install raspberrypi-kernel

Once the install is done, make sure to reboot your Raspberry Pi and you’ll be Dirty COW-free!

The post Fix Dirty COW on the Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Meter Maid Monitor: parking protection with Pi

via Raspberry Pi

Parking can be a challenge in big cities like San Francisco. Spots are scarce, regulations are confusing, and the cost is often too darn high. At the TechCrunch Disrupt hackathon recently, John Naulty reached for a Raspberry Pi to help solve some of his parking problems.

The dreaded parking enforcement Interceptors! Source: Wikipedia

One of the dreaded parking enforcement Interceptors! Source: Wikipedia

John explained that the parking spots near his home only allow two hour parking. But he had figured out that you only get caught exceeding that if the parking enforcement officers see your car in the same spot for more than two hours. If he could somehow know when a meter maid’s Interceptor drives by, he would have a two hour heads-up before he had to move his vehicle.

Here’s how the Raspberry Pi comes into play:

“I used a Raspberry Pi with the Camera Module and OpenCV as a motion detector,” Naulty explains, rattling off the long list of tech that went into creating Meter Maid Monitor. “The camera monitors traffic and takes photos. The pictures are uploaded to AWS, where an EC2 instance running the TensorFlow supervised learning platform does the image recognition. I’ve trained it to recognise meter maid cars. Finally, if there’s more than a 75 percent chance of the car being a meter maid, it sends me a text message using Twilio, so I can move my car before I get a ticket”

If this all feels a bit nefarious and subversive to you, hopefully you can at the very least appreciate John’s clever use of technology. Either way, if you want to see his code for the Raspberry Pi and for the AWS instance, head on over to his GitHub repo for this project. If you have any other smart ideas for using Raspberry Pi to make city parking more bearable, let’s hear ’em!

The post Meter Maid Monitor: parking protection with Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

RecordShelf – vinyl selection lightshow spectacular

via Raspberry Pi

Mike Smith wanted to be able to locate specific records in his collection with ease, so he turned to a Raspberry Pi for assistance.

A web server running on the Pi catalogues his vast vinyl collection. Upon selecting a specific record, the appropriate shelf lights up, followed by a single NeoPixel highlighting the record’s location.

recordShelf demo 2

recordShelf helps organize and visualize dat about your record collection. This is my second video demonstrating it’s latest form.

The lights are controlled with Adafruit’s FadeCandy, a dithering USB controller driver with its own software that allows for easier direction of a NeoPixel. It also puts on a pretty nifty light show.

Records can be selected via artist, title, record label, a unique index number, or even vinyl colour. This also allowed for Mike to select all records in a specific category and highlight them at once; how many records by a specific artist or label, for example.


Further down the line, Mike is also planning on RFID support, allowing him to scan a record and have the appropriate shelf light up to indicate where it should be stored. Keep up to date with the build via the project’s Hackaday.io page.

The post RecordShelf – vinyl selection lightshow spectacular appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Sisyphus: the kinetic art table

via Raspberry Pi

Surely if he had been given the opportunity, Sisyphus would have engineered a way out of his eternal punishment of rolling a boulder up a hill. It’s just too bad for him that Raspberry Pi wasn’t around to help. While it’s a far cry from his arduous task, the Pi has been used to power Bruce Shapiro’s Sisyphus, a continuous and ever-changing kinetic art piece that creates unique design patterns in sand using a small metal ball.


Sisyphus is truly mesmerising. We learned this first-hand: at Maker Faire New York earlier this month, it captured the attention of not only the Raspberry Pi crew, but also thousands of attendees throughout the weekend. Sisyphus momentarily drowned out the noise and action of the Faire.

You can think of Sisyphus as a cross between an Etch A Sketch and Spirograph, except this is no toy.

Under the table is a two-motor robot (the “Sisbot”) that moves a magnet which draws a steel ball through the sand. The motors are controlled by a small Raspberry Pi computer which plays a set of path files, much like a music player plays an MP3 file.


Bruce is using Kickstarter in the hope of transitioning Sisyphus from what’s currently a large art installation exhibited around the world into a beautiful piece to be enjoyed in the home, as both furniture and art.

annmarie thomas on Twitter

Sisyphus- Stunning art/furniture kickstarter (fully funded in <a day) by friend Bruce Shapiro. https://t.co/ijxHQ0fYb5

Bruce says:

Of all works I made, Sisyphus stood out – it was my first CNC machine to break out of the studio/shop. No longer tasked with cutting materials to be used in making sculptures, it was the sculpture itself. It was also unique in another way – I wanted to live with it in my home. I’ve spent the last three years perfecting a home version that’s beautiful, user-friendly, near-silent, and that will run for years.

Like most great Maker Faire projects, it’s centred around a wonderful community. The collaboration and access to tools in Shapiro’s local makerspace helped develop the final design seen today. While Shapiro’s original makerspace has since closed its doors, Shapiro and his fellow members opened up what is now Nordeast Makers. It’s where the production for Sisyphus will take place.


The Kickstarter products come in three styles: an end table, and two different coffee tables. You might want to find another place to display your coffee table books, though, so as to keep Sisyphus’s designs visible…


This Kickstarter won’t be running forever, so be sure to pledge if you love the sound of the Sisyphus.

The post Sisyphus: the kinetic art table appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Five(ish) awesome RetroPie builds

via Raspberry Pi

If you’ve yet to hear about RetroPie, how’s it going living under that rock?

RetroPie, for the few who are unfamiliar, allows users to play retro video games on their Raspberry Pi or PC. From Alex Kidd to Ecco the Dolphin, Streets of Rage 2 to Cool Spot, nostalgia junkies can get their fill by flashing the RetroPie image to their Pi and plugging in their TV and a couple of USB controllers.

But for many, this simple setup is not enough. Alongside the RetroPie unit, many makers are building incredible cases and modifications to make their creation stand out from the rest.

Here’s five of what I believe to be some of the best RetroPie builds shared on social media:

1. Furniture Builds

If you don’t have the space for an arcade machine, why not incorporate RetroPie into your coffee table or desk?

This ‘Mid-century-ish Retro Games Table’ by Reddit user GuzziGuy fits a screen and custom-made controllers beneath a folding surface, allowing full use of the table when you’re not busy Space Raiding or Mario Karting.

GuzziGuy RetroPie Table

2. Arcade Cabinets

While the arcade cabinet at Pi Towers has seen better days (we have #LukeTheIntern working on it as I type), many of you makers are putting us to shame with your own builds. Whether it be a tabletop version or full 7ft cabinet, more and more RetroPie arcades are popping up, their builders desperate to replicate the sights of our gaming pasts.

One maker, YouTuber Bob Clagett, built his own RetroPie Arcade Cabinet from scratch, documenting the entire process on his channel.

With sensors that start the machine upon your approach, LED backlighting, and cartoon vinyl artwork of his family, it’s easy to see why this is a firm favourite.

Arcade Cabinet build – Part 3 // How-To

Check out how I made this fully custom arcade cabinet, powered by a Raspberry Pi, to play retro games! Subscribe to my channel: http://bit.ly/1k8msFr Get digital plans for this cabinet to build your own!

3. Handheld Gaming

If you’re looking for a more personal gaming experience, or if you simply want to see just how small you can make your build, you can’t go wrong with a handheld gaming console. With the release of the Raspberry Pi Zero, the ability to fit an entire RetroPie setup within the smallest of spaces has become somewhat of a social media maker challenge.

Chase Lambeth used an old Burger King toy and Pi Zero to create one of the smallest RetroPie Gameboys around… and it broke the internet in the process.

Mini Gameboy Chase Lambeth

4. Console Recycling

What better way to play a retro game than via a retro game console? And while I don’t condone pulling apart a working NES or MegaDrive, there’s no harm in cannibalising a deceased unit for the greater good, or using one of many 3D-printable designs to recreate a classic.

Here’s YouTuber DaftMike‘s entry into the RetroPie Hall of Fame: a mini-NES with NFC-enabled cartridges that autoplay when inserted.

Raspberry Pi Mini NES Classic Console

This is a demo of my Raspberry Pi ‘NES Classic’ build. You can see photos, more details and code here: http://www.daftmike.com/2016/07/NESPi.html Update video: https://youtu.be/M0hWhv1lw48 Update #2: https://youtu.be/hhYf5DPzLqg Electronics kits are now available for pre-order, details here: http://www.daftmike.com/p/nespi-electronics-kit.html Build Guide Update: https://youtu.be/8rFBWdRpufo Build Guide Part 1: https://youtu.be/8feZYk9HmYg Build Guide Part 2: https://youtu.be/vOz1-6GqTZc New case design files: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1727668 Better Snap Fit Cases!

5. Everything Else

I can’t create a list of RetroPie builds without mentioning the unusual creations that appear on our social media feeds from time to time. And while you may consider putting more than one example in #5 cheating, I say… well, I say pfft.

Example 1 – Sean (from SimpleCove)’s Retro Arcade

It felt wrong to include this within Arcade Cabinets as it’s not really a cabinet. Creating the entire thing from scratch using monitors, wood, and a lot of veneer, the end result could easily have travelled here from the 1940s.

Retro Arcade Cabinet Using A Raspberry Pi & RetroPie

I’ve wanted one of these raspberry pi/retro pi arcade systems for a while but wanted to make a special box to put it in that looked like an antique table top TV/radio. I feel the outcome of this project is exactly that.

Example 2 – the HackerHouse Portable Console… built-in controller… thing

The team at HackerHouse, along with many other makers, decided to incorporate the entire RetroPie build into the controller, allowing you to easily take your gaming system with you without the need for a separate console unit. Following on from the theme of their YouTube channel, they offer a complete tutorial on how to make the controller.

Make a Raspberry Pi Portable Arcade Console (with Retropie)

Find out how to make an easy portable arcade console (cabinet) using a Raspberry Pi. You can bring it anywhere, plug it into any tv, and play all your favorite classic ROMs. This arcade has 4 general buttons and a joystick, but you can also plug in any old usb enabled controller.

Example 3 – Zach’s PiCart

RetroPie inside a NES game cartridge… need I say more?

Pi Cart: a Raspberry Pi Retro Gaming Rig in an NES Cartridge

I put a Raspberry Pi Zero (and 2,400 vintage games) into an NES cartridge and it’s awesome. Powered by RetroPie. I also wrote a step-by-step guide on howchoo and a list of all the materials you’ll need to build your own: https://howchoo.com/g/mti0oge5nzk/pi-cart-a-raspberry-pi-retro-gaming-rig-in-an-nes-cartridge

Here’s a video to help you set up your own RetroPie. What games would you play first? And what other builds have caught your attention online?

The post Five(ish) awesome RetroPie builds appeared first on Raspberry Pi.