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New Chair and Trustees of the Raspberry Pi Foundation

via Raspberry Pi

I am delighted to share the news that we have appointed a new Chair and Trustees of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. Between them, they bring an enormous range of experience and expertise to what is already a fantastic Board of Trustees, and I am really looking forward to working with them.

New Chair of the Board of Trustees: John Lazar 

John Lazar has been appointed as the new Chair of the Board of Trustees. John is a software engineer and business leader who is focused on combining technology and entrepreneurship to generate lasting positive impact.

Formerly the Chairman and CEO of Metaswitch Networks, John is now an angel investor, startup mentor, non-executive chairman and board director, including serving as the Chair of What3Words. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and played an active role in developing the programme of study for England’s school Computer Science curriculum. John has also spent many years working on tech-related non-profit initiatives in Africa and co-founded Enza Capital, which invests in early-stage African technology companies that solve pressing problems.

John takes over the Chair from David Cleevely, who has reached the end of his two three-year terms as Trustee and Chair of the Foundation. David has made a huge contribution to the Foundation over that time, and we are delighted that he will continue to be involved in our work as one of the founding members of the Supporters Club.

New Trustees: Amali de Alwis, Charles Leadbeater, Dan Labbad

Alongside John, we are welcoming three new Trustees to the Board of Trustees: 

  • Amali de Alwis is the UK Managing Director of Microsoft for Startups, and is the former CEO of Code First: Girls. She is also a Board member at Ada National College for Digital Skills, sits on the Diversity & Inclusion Board at the Institute of Coding, is an Advisory Board member at the Founders Academy, and was a founding member at Tech Talent Charter.
  • Charles Leadbeater is an independent author, a social entrepreneur, and a leading authority on innovation and creativity. He has advised companies, cities, and governments around the world on innovation strategy and has researched and written extensively on innovation in education. Charles is also a Trustee of the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.
  • Dan Labbad is Chief Executive and Executive Member of the Board of The Crown Estate. He was previously at Lendlease, where he was Chief Executive Officer of Europe from 2009. Dan is also a Director of The Hornery Institute and Ark Schools.

New Member: Suranga Chandratillake 

I am also delighted to announce that we have appointed Suranga Chandratillake as a Member of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. Suranga is a technologist, entrepreneur, and investor.

Suranga Chandratillake

He founded the intelligent search company blinkx and is now a General Partner at Balderton Capital. Suranga is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader, and he serves on the UK Government’s Council for Science and Technology.

What is a Board of Trustees anyway? 

As a charity, the Raspberry Pi Foundation is governed by a Board of Trustees that is ultimately responsible for what we do and how we are run. It is the Trustees’ job to make sure that we are focused on our mission, which for us means helping more people learn about computing, computer science, and related subjects. The Trustees also have all the usual responsibilities of company directors, including making sure that we use our resources effectively. As Chief Executive, I am accountable to the Board of Trustees. 

We’ve always been fortunate to attract the most amazing people to serve as Trustees and, as volunteers, they are incredibly generous with their time, sharing their expertise and experience on a wide range of issues. They are an important part of the team. Trustees serve for up to two terms of three years so that we always have fresh views and experience to draw on.

How do you appoint Trustees? 

Appointments to the Board of Trustees follow open recruitment and selection processes that are overseen by the Foundation’s Nominations Committee, supported by independent external advisers. Our aim is to appoint Trustees who bring different backgrounds, perspectives, and lived experience, as well as a range of skills. As with all appointments, we consider diversity at every aspect of the recruitment and selection processes.

Formally, Trustees are elected by the Foundation’s Members at our Annual General Meeting. This year’s AGM took place last week on Zoom. Members are also volunteers, and they play an important role in holding the Board of Trustees to account, helping to shape our strategy, and acting as advocates for our mission.

You can see the full list of Trustees and Members on our website.

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S.H.I.E.L.D. yourself from unwanted mic and camera access

via Arduino Blog

If you haven’t heard, a lot of us are working from home these days, making mic and camera discipline more important than ever. To help avoid unwanted recording, Tovi Levis created the S.H.I.E.L.D. device, which stands for Software and Hardware for Invisible Eavesdroppers and Lurkers Detection.

This amply-named project uses an Arduino Uno to control a pair of WS2812B lights mounted to the top of your computer monitor. Lights shine through acrylic icons of a microphone and camera, with red indicating “on” and green for “off” and safe. There is also a buzzer to note status changes.

The S.H.I.E.L.D. communicates with the host PC over USB, which runs a companion monitoring app that can be used independently as well. More details are available on GitHub, and a demo/explanation can be seen in Levis’ video below.

AI-Man: a handy guide to video game artificial intelligence

via Raspberry Pi

Discover how non-player characters make decisions by tinkering with this Unity-based Pac-Man homage. Paul Roberts wrote this for the latest issue of Wireframe magazine.

From the first video game to the present, artificial intelligence has been a vital part of the medium. While most early games had enemies that simply walked left and right, like the Goombas in Super Mario Bros., there were also games like Pac-Man, where each ghost appeared to move intelligently. But from a programming perspective, how do we handle all the different possible states we want our characters to display?

Here’s AI-Man, our homage to a certain Namco maze game. You can switch between AI types to see how they affect the ghosts’ behaviours.

For example, how do we control whether a ghost is chasing Pac-Man, or running away, or even returning to their home? To explore these behaviours, we’ll be tinkering with AI-Man – a Pac-Man-style game developed in Unity. It will show you how the approaches discussed in this article are implemented, and there’s code available for you to modify and add to. You can freely download the AI-Man project here. One solution to managing the different states a character can be in, which has been used for decades, is a finite state machine, or FSM for short. It’s an approach that describes the high-level actions of an agent, and takes its name simply from the fact that there are a finite number of states from which to transition between, with each state only ever doing one thing.


Altered states

To explain what’s meant by high level, let’s take a closer look at the ghosts in Pac-Man. The highlevel state of a ghost is to ‘Chase’ Pac-Man, but the low level is how the ghost actually does this. In Pac-Man, each ghost has its own behaviour in which it hunts the player down, but they’re all in the same high-level state of ‘Chase’. Looking at Figure 1, you can see how the overall behaviour of a ghost can be depicted extremely easily, but there’s a lot of hidden complexity. At what point do we transition between states? What are the conditions on moving between states across the connecting lines? Once we have this information, the diagram can be turned into code with relative ease. You could use simple switch statements to achieve this, or we could achieve the same using an object-oriented approach.

Figure 1: A finite state machine

Using switch statements can quickly become cumbersome the more states we add, so I’ve used the object-oriented approach in the accompanying project, and an example code snippet can be seen in Code Listing 1. Each state handles whether it needs to transition into another state, and lets the state machine know. If a transition’s required, the Exit() function is called on the current state, before calling the Enter() function on the new state. This is done to ensure any setup or cleanup is done, after which the Update() function is called on whatever the current state is. The Update()function is where the low-level code for completing the state is processed. For a project as simple as Pac-Man, this only involves setting a different position for the ghost to move to.


Hidden complexity

Extending this approach, it’s reasonable for a state to call multiple states from within. This is called a hierarchical finite state machine, or HFSM for short. An example is an agent in Call of Duty: Strike Team being instructed to seek a stealthy position, so the high-level state is ‘Find Cover’, but within that, the agent needs to exit the dumpster he’s currently hiding in, find a safe location, calculate a safe path to that location, then repeatedly move between points on that path until he reaches the target position.

FSMs can appear somewhat predictable as the agent will always transition into the same state. This can be accommodated for by having multiple options that achieve the same goal. For example, when the ghosts in our Unity project are in the ‘Chase’ state, they can either move to the player, get in front of the player, or move to a position behind the player. There’s also an option to move to a random position. The FSM implemented has each ghost do one of these, whereas the behaviour tree allows all ghosts to switch between the options every ten seconds. A limitation of the FSM approach is that you can only ever be in a single state at a particular time. Imagine a tank battle game where multiple enemies can be engaged. Simply being in the ‘Retreat’ state doesn’t look smart if you’re about to run into the sights of another enemy. The worst-case scenario would be our tank transitions between ‘Attack’ and ‘Retreat’ states on each frame – an issue known as state thrashing – and gets stuck, and seemingly confused about what to do in this situation. What we need is away to be in multiple states at the same time: ideally retreating from tank A, whilst attacking tank B. This is where fuzzy finite state machines, or FFSM for short, come in useful.

This approach allows you to be in a particular state to a certain degree. For example, my tank could be 80% committed to the Retreat state (avoid tank A), and 20% committed to the Attack state (attack tank B). This allows us to both Retreat and Attack at the same time. To achieve this, on each update, your agent needs to check each possible state to determine its degree of commitment, and then call each of the active states’ updates. This differs from a standard FSM, where you can only ever be in a single state. FFSMs can be in none, one, two, or however many states you like at one time. This can prove tricky to balance, but it does offer an alternative to the standard approach.


No memory

Another potential issue with an FSM is that the agent has no memory of what they were previously doing. Granted, this may not be important: in the example given, the ghosts in Pac-Man don’t care about what they were doing, they only care about what they are doing, but in other games, memory can be extremely important. Imagine instructing a character to gather wood in a game like Age of Empires, and then the character gets into a fight. It would be extremely frustrating if the characters just stood around with nothing to do after the fight had concluded, and for the player to have to go back through all these characters and reinstruct them after the fight is over. It would be much better for the characters to return to their previous duties.

“FFSMs can be in one, none,

two, or however many states

you like.”

We can incorporate the idea of memory quite easily by using the stack data structure. The stack will hold AI states, with only the top-most element receiving the update. This in effect means that when a state is completed, it’s removed from the stack and the previous state is then processed. Figure 2 depicts how this was achieved in our Unity project. To differentiate the states from the FSM approach, I’ve called them tasks for the stackbased implementation. Looking at Figure 2, it shows how (from the bottom), the ghost was chasing the player, then the player collected a power pill, which resulted in the AI adding an Evade_Task – this now gets the update call, not the Chase_Task. While evading the player, the ghost was then eaten.

At this point, the ghost needed to return home, so the appropriate task was added. Once home, the ghost needed to exit this area, so again, the relevant task was added. At the point the ghost exited home, the ExitHome_Task was removed, which drops processing back to MoveToHome_Task. This was no longer required, so it was also removed. Back in the Evade_Task, if the power pill was still active, the ghost would return to avoiding the player, but if it had worn off, this task, in turn, got removed, putting the ghost back in its default task of Chase_Task, which will get the update calls until something else in the world changes.

Figure 2: Stack-based finite state machine.


Behaviour trees

In 2002, Halo 2 programmer Damian Isla expanded on the idea of HFSM in a way that made it more scalable and modular for the game’s AI. This became known as the behaviour tree approach. It’s now a staple in AI game development. The behaviour tree is made up of nodes, which can be one of three types – composite, decorator, or leaf nodes. Each has a different function within the tree and affects the flow through the tree. Figure 3 shows how this approach is set up for our Unity project. The states we’ve explored so far are called leaf nodes. Leaf nodes end a particular branch of the tree and don’t have child nodes – these are where the AI behaviours are located. For example, Leaf_ExitHome, Leaf_Evade, and Leaf_ MoveAheadOfPlayer all tell the ghost where to move to. Composite nodes can have multiple child nodes and are used to determine the order in which the children are called. This could be in the order in which they’re described by the tree, or by selection, where the children nodes will compete, with the parent node selecting which child node gets the go-ahead. Selector_Chase allows the ghost to select a single path down the tree by choosing a random option, whereas Sequence_ GoHome has to complete all the child paths to complete its behaviour.

Code Listing 2 shows how simple it is to choose a random behaviour to use – just be sure to store the index for the next update. Code Listing 3 demonstrates how to go through all child nodes, and to return SUCCESS only when all have completed, otherwise the status RUNNING is returned. FAILURE only gets returned when a child node itself returns a FAILURE status.


Complex behaviours

Although not used in our example project, behaviour trees can also have nodes called decorators. A decorator node can only have a single child, and can modify the result returned. For example, a decorator may iterate the child node for a set period, perhaps indefinitely, or even flip the result returned from being a success to a failure. From what first appears to be a collection of simple concepts, complex behaviours can then develop.

Figure 3: Behaviour tree

Video game AI is all about the illusion of intelligence. As long as the characters are believable in their context, the player should maintain their immersion in the game world and enjoy the experience we’ve made. Hopefully, the approaches introduced here highlight how even simple approaches can be used to develop complex characters. This is just the tip of the iceberg: AI development is a complex subject, but it’s also fun and rewarding to explore.

Wireframe #43, with the gorgeous Sea of Stars on the cover.

The latest issue of Wireframe Magazine is out now. available in print from the Raspberry Pi Press onlinestore, your local newsagents, and the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge.

You can also download the PDF directly from the Wireframe Magazine website.

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HOW TO: Edge-Lit Portrait (work in progress)

via WyoLum Blog

Ok, so I’m a little late to the game. People have been making cool stuff using edge-lit acrylic for a long time now. A friend coaxed me into making a sign, and the potential and possibilities of edge-lit artwork captured my imagination. It is a bit labor intensive, but this tutorial, will walk you through converting a photograph or image into free-standing, desktop portrait.

Required

  1. Photo
  2. 1/4″ clear acrylic sheet
  3. 1/8″ dark acrylic Sheet (background)
  4. Button
  5. Panel mount barrell adapter
  6. Power supply

Steps

  1. Prepare the image
  2. Cut the image
  3. Cut the base
  4. Assemble the base
  5. Prepare the image

1. Prepare the image

Trim the image to size. Cutting around the subject looks much better than trying to capture the background in my oppinion. Using InkScape (the best) draw a poly ground around thehead.

Use this tool
Tight trim
Click the image, hold shift, click border, right click and select “Set Clip”

File –> Export PNG image…

Run dither.py

File –> import (out_w_neg.bmp)

Resize outline, center on negative image

Cut

Ready to cut

Cut outline and dithered negative in clear acrylic, cut outline alone in dark acrylic

2. Cut Base

3. Assemble Base

Wiring diagram
Use copper tape to route the signal from the button, to the CPU.
Test the leads of the barrell adapter to make sure you know which is + and which is ground.
Mark the center of the base and stick the LEDs to the base. Add standoffs.
Solder LED leads, keep it flat!

Haunted House hacks

via Raspberry Pi

Spookify your home in time for Halloween with Rob Zwetsloot and these terror-ific projects!

We picked four of our favourites from a much longer feature in the latest issue of The MagPi magazine, so make sure you check it out if you need more Haunted House hacks in your life.

Raspberry Pi Haunted House

This project is a bit of a mixture of indoors and outdoors, with a doorbell on the house activating a series of spooky effects like a creaking door, ‘malfunctioning’ porch lights, and finally a big old monster mash in the garage.

A Halloween themed doorbell

MagPi magazine talked to its creator Stewart Watkiss about it a few years ago and he revealed how he used a PiFace HAT to interface with home automation techniques to create the scary show, although it can be made much easier these days thanks to Energenie. Our favourite part, though, is still the Home Alone-esque monster party that caps it off.

Check it our for yourself here.

Eye of Sauron

It’s a very nice-looking build as well

The dreaded dark lord Sauron from Lord of the Rings watched over Middle-earth in the form of a giant flaming eye atop his black tower, Barad-dûr. Mike Christian’s version sits on top of a shed in Saratoga, CA.

The eye of sauron on top of a barn lit in red lights
Atop the shed with some extra light effects, it looks very scary

It makes use of the Snake Eyes Bonnet from Adafruit, with some code modifications and projecting onto a bigger eye. Throw in some cool lights and copper wires and you get a nice little effect, much like that from the films.

There are loads more cool photos on Mike’s original project page.

Raspberry Pi-powered Jack-o-Lantern

We love the eyes and scary sounds in this version that seem to follow you around

A classic indoor Halloween decoration (and outdoor, according to American movies) is the humble Jack-o’-lantern. While you could carve your own for this kind of project (and we’ve seen many people do so), this version uses a pre-cut, 3D-printed pumpkin.

3D printed pumpkin glowing orange
The original 3D print lit with a single source is still fairly scary

If you want to put one outside as well, we highly recommend you add some waterproofing or put it under a porch of some kind, especially if you live in the UK.

Here’s a video about the project by the maker.

Scary door

You’re unlikely to trick someone already in your house with a random door that has appeared out of nowhere, but while they’re investigating they’ll get the scare of their life. This door was created as a ‘sequel’ to a Scary Porch, and has a big monitor where a window might be in the door. There’s also an array of air-pistons just behind the door to make it sound like someone is trying to get out.

There are various videos that can play on the door screen, and they’re randomised so any viewers won’t know what to expect. This one also uses relays, so be careful.

This project is the brainchild of the element14 community and you can read more about how it was made here.


The MagPi magazine is out now, available in print from the Raspberry Pi Press onlinestore, your local newsagents, and the Raspberry Pi Store, Cambridge.

You can also download the PDF directly from the MagPi magazine website.

The post Haunted House hacks appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build an e-paper to-do list with Raspberry Pi

via Raspberry Pi

James Bruxton (or @xrobotosuk on Instagram) built an IoT-controlled e-paper message board using Raspberry Pi. Updating it is easy: just edit a Google sheet, and the message board will update with the new data.

Harnessing Google power

This smart message board uses e-paper, which has very low power consumption. Combining this with the Google Docs API (which allows you to write code to read and write to Google Docs) and Raspberry Pi makes it possible to build a message board that polls a Google Sheet and updates whenever there’s new data. This guide helped James write the Google Docs API code.

We’ll do #4 for you, James!

Why e-paper?

James’s original plan was to hook up his Raspberry Pi to a standard monitor and use Google Docs so people could update the display via mobile app. However, a standard monitor consumes a lot of power, due to its backlight, and if you set it to go into sleep mode, people would just walk past it and not see updates to the list unless they remember to wake the device up.

Raspberry Pi wearing its blue e-paper HAT on the left, which connects to the display on the right via a ribbon cable

Enter e-paper (the same stuff used for Kindle devices), which only consumes power when it’s updating. Once you’ve got the info you want on the e-paper, you can even disconnect it entirely from your power source and the screen will still display whatever the least update told it to. James’s top tip for your project: go for the smallest e-paper display possible, as those things are expensive. He went with this one, which comes with a HAT for Raspberry Pi and a ribbon cable to connect the two.

The display disconnected from any power and still clearly readable

The HAT has an adaptor for plugging into the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins, and a breakout header for the SPI pins. James found it’s not as simple as enabling the SPI on his Raspberry Pi and the e-paper display springing to life: you need a bit of code to enable the SPI display to act as the main display for the Raspberry Pi. Luckily, the code for this is on the wiki of Waveshare, the producer of HAT and display James used for this project.

Making it pretty

A 3D-printed case, which looks like a classic photo frame but with a hefty in-built stand to hold it up and provide enough space for the Raspberry Pi to sit on, is home to James’s finished smart to-do list. The e-paper is so light and thin it can just be sticky-taped into the frame.

The roomy frame stand

James’s creation is powered by Raspberry Pi 4, but you don’t need that much power, and he’s convinced you’ll be fine with any Raspberry Pi model that has 40 GPIO pins.

Extra points for this maker, as he’s put all the CAD files and code you’ll need to make your own e-paper message board on GitHub.

If you’re into e-paper stuff but are wedded to your handwritten to-do lists, then why not try building this super slow movie player instead? The blog squad went *nuts* for it when we posted it last month.

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