Tag Archives: YouTubers

How to control multiple servo motors with Raspberry Pi

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In the latest Explaining Computers video, Christopher Barnatt explains how to use servo motors with Raspberry Pi. Using servos is a great introduction to the digital making side of computing; servos allow you to control the movement of all manner of project components with your Raspberry Pi and a motor controller attached to its GPIO pins.

Raspberry Pi Servo Motor Control

Control of SG90 servos in Python on a Raspberry Pi, including an explanation of PWM and how a servo differs from a motor. You can download the code from the video at: https://www.explainingcomputers.com/pi_servos_video.html The five-pack of SG90 servos used in this video was purchased on Amazon.co.uk here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07H9VC698/ref=nosim?tag=explainin-21 with a similar product on Amazon.com here: https://amzn.to/2QHshx3 (affiliate links).

Servos and your Raspberry Pi

Christopher picked up his SG90 servo motors online, where you’ll find a variety of servo options. What type of servo you need depends on the project you want to create, so be sure to consider the weight and size of what you plan to move, and the speed at which you need to move it.

As the motor controller connects via GPIO, you can even use the tiny £5 Raspberry Pi Zero to control your servo, which makes adding movement to your projects an option even when you’re under tight space constraints.

Find out more

For other detailed computing videos, be sure to subscribe to the Explaining Computers YouTube channel.

And for more Raspberry Pi projects, check out the Raspberry Pi projects page.

Raspberry Pi projects PSA

We’re always looking for people to join our incredible community of translators to help us translate our free resources, including the free projects found on our projects page.

If you speak English and another language and would like to give a portion of your time to making our resources available to more people across the globe, sign up as a translator today.

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Brass freeform circuit (Raspberry Pi) Instagram tracker

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A few of our favourite online makers decided to take part in a makers’ Secret Santa, producing home-made gifts based on their skills. So, OBVIOUSLY, Estefannie used a Raspberry Pi. Thanks, Estefannie.

HOW I HACKED INSTAGRAM FOR MY SECRET SANTA

I got in a Maker Secret Santa this year so I decided to make a thing and hack Instagram for it. #YTMakersSecretSanta MAKERS SECRET SANTA! FOLLOW EVERYONE: Kids Invent Stuff https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-glo52BMvZH9PPUamjGIcw Colin Furze https://www.youtube.com/user/colinfurze The Hacksmithhttps://www.youtube.com/user/MstrJames Look Mum No Computer https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCafxR2HWJRmMfSdyZXvZMTw Sufficiently Advanced https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVS89U86PwqzNkK2qYNbk5A Subscribe to my channel if you’d like to be the first to know when I publish the next video :) Let me know what other videos you would like to see.

In the video above, Estefannie uses a Raspberry Pi to hack Instagram to illuminate a handmade freeform circuit whenever Kids Invent Stuff gains a like on a post.

“But why not use the Instagram API?”, I hear you cry. Well, as Estefannie explains, she wanted the gift to be a surprise, and if she had used the Instagram API, she would have had to have asked them for their details in order to access it.

Watch to the end of the video to see the gift that Estefannie received from her Secret Santa, a certain Colin Furze. You can see his complete build video for the Cat-o-Matic below.

CAT-O-MATIC auto cat feeder/terrifier YTMakers Secret Santa

Fear not your cat feeding issues are sorted………..Furzestyle No cat was harmed in making of this but it did run off……….but came back and is fine. Thanks to the Kids Invent Stuff channel for organising this Secret Santa check them out here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-glo52BMvZH9PPUamjGIcw And the other channels involved Estefannie Explains https://www.youtube.com/user/estefanniegg Sufficiently Advanced https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVS89U86PwqzNkK2qYNbk5A Look Mum No Computer https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCafxR2HWJRmMfSdyZXvZMTw The Hacksmiths https://www.youtube.com/user/MstrJames Check out the new FURZE Merch store.

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How to run a script at start-up on a Raspberry Pi using crontab

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Do you need to run a script whenever your Raspberry Pi turns on? Here’s Estefannie to explain how to edit crontab to do exactly that.

How to start a script at start-up on a Raspberry Pi // LEARN SOMETHING

Do you want your Raspberry Pi to automatically run your code when it is connected to power? Then you are in the right place. In this new #LEARNSOMETHING video I show you how to make you Raspberry Pi run your script automatically when it is connected to a power source.

Running script on startup

While there are many ways of asking your Raspberry Pi to run a script on start-up, crontab -e is definitely one of the easiest.

AND, as Estefannie explains (in part thanks to me bullying asking her to do so), if you create a run folder on your desktop, you can switch out the Python scripts you want to run at start-up whenever you like and will never have to edit crontab again!

Weeeeee!

Now go write some wonderful and inspiring festive scripts while I take a well-earned nap. I just got off a plane yet here I am, writing blog posts for y’all because I love you THAT DARN MUCH!

Teddy perfectly demonstrating my jet-lagged expression

And don’t forget to like and subscribe for more Estefannie Explains it All goodness!

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Really, really awesome Raspberry Pi NeoPixel LED mirror

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Check out Super Make Something’s awesome NeoPixel LED mirror: a 576 RGB LED display that converts images via the Raspberry Pi Camera Module and Raspberry Pi 3B+ into a pixelated light show.

Neopixel LED Mirror (Python, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, 3D Printing, Laser Cutting!) DIY How To

Time to pull out all the stops for the biggest Super Make Something project to date! Using 3D printing, laser cutting, a Raspberry Pi, computer vision, Python, and nearly 600 Neopixel LEDs, I build a low resolution LED mirror that displays your reflection on a massive 3 foot by 3 foot grid made from an array of 24 by 24 RGB LEDs!

Mechanical mirrors

If you’re into cool uses of tech, you may be aware of Daniel Rozin, the creative artist building mechanical mirrors out of wooden panels, trash, and…penguins, to name but a few of his wonderful builds.

A woman standing in front of a mechanical mirror made of toy penguins

Yup, this is a mechanical mirror made of toy penguins.

A digital mechanical mirror?

Inspired by Daniel Rozin’s work, Alex, the person behind Super Make Something, put an RGB LED spin on the concept, producing this stunning mirror that thoroughly impressed visitors at Cleveland Maker Faire last month.

“Inspired by Danny Rozin’s mechanical mirrors, this 3 foot by 3 foot mirror is powered by a Raspberry Pi, and uses Python and OpenCV computer vision libraries to process captured images in real time to light up 576 individual RGB LEDs!” Alex explains on Instagram. “Also onboard are nearly 600 3D-printed squares to diffuse the light from each NeoPixel, as well as 16 laser-cut panels to hold everything in place!”

The video above gives a brilliantly detailed explanation of how Alex made the, so we highly recommend giving it a watch if you’re feeling inspired to make your own.

Seriously, we really want to make one of these for Raspberry Pi Towers!

As always, be sure to subscribe to Super Make Something on YouTube and leave a comment on the video if, like us, you love the project. Most online makers are producing content such as this with very little return on their investment, so every like and subscriber really does make a difference.

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Project anyone’s face onto your own with Raspberry Pi Zero

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Sean Hodgins is back with a new Halloween-themed project, this time using a pico projector and a Raspberry Pi Zero to display images and animations onto a mask.

It’s kinda creepy but very, very cool.

Face Changing Projection Mask – Be Anyone

Have a hard time deciding what to be on Halloween? Just be everything. Some links for the project below. Support my Free Open Source Projects by becoming joining the Patreon!

Face-changing projection mask

Sean designed his own PCB – classic Sean – to connect the header pins of a Raspberry Pi Zero to a pico projector. He used Photoshop to modify video and image files in order to correct the angle of projection onto the mask.

He then 3D-printed this low poly mask from Thingiverse, adapting the design to allow him to attach it to a welding mask headband he purchased online.

As Sean explains in the video, there are a lot of great ways you can use the mask. Our favourite suggestion is using a camera to take a photo of someone and project their own face back at them. This idea is reminiscent of the As We Are project in Columbus, Ohio, where visitors sit inside a 14-foot tall head as their face is displayed on screens covering the outside.

For more of Sean’s excellent Raspberry Pi projects, check out his YouTube channel, and be sure to show him some love by clicking the ol’ subscribe button.

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Tinkernut’s Raspberry Pi video guide

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“If you’ve ever been curious about electronics or programming, then the Raspberry Pi is an excellent tool to have in your arsenal,” enthuses Tinkernut in his latest video, Raspberry Pi – All You Need To Know.

And we aren’t going to argue with that.

Raspberry Pi – All You Need To Know

If you keep your ear to the Tinkering community, I’m sure you’ve heard whispers (and shouts) of the Raspberry Pi. And if you wanted to get into making, tinkering, computing, or electronics, the Raspberry Pi is a great tool to have in your tool belt. But what is it?

“This Pi can knit a Hogwarts sweater while saving a cat from a tree,” he declares. “It can recite the Canterbury Tales while rebuilding an engine.” Tinkernut’s new explainer comes after a short hiatus from content creation, and it’s a cracking little intro to what Raspberry Pi is, what it can do, and which model is right for you.

“This little pincushion, right here”

Tinkernut, we’re glad you’re back. And thank you for making us your first subject in your new format.

If you like what you see, be sure to check out more Tinkernut videos, and subscribe.

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